A Nationwide Snapshot of the Predictors of and Barriers to School Garden Success

Kate G. Burt, Nicole Lindel, Jiayu Wang, Marissa Burgermaster, Joseph Fera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To explore the degree and predictors of and barriers to school garden integration (termed success). Design: A 30-item online survey consisting of demographic, garden characteristic, and barrier questions, as well as the School Garden Integration Scale, was conducted in 266 school garden organizations (13 national, 8 regional, and 245 state or local). Participants: A total of 414 school gardeners from 38 states and Puerto Rico. Main Outcome Measures: School garden success using the GREEN Tool. Analysis: Descriptive statistics were used to determine the degree of success of school garden programs and explore barriers. Multiple regression analysis was conducted to determine independent predictors of school garden success. Results: The average score was 37 (range 1–53, of a possible 57 points), indicating moderate success. Operating budget (P < .001), operating time (P < .05), and planting in-ground (P < .01) had a positive significant influence on success score, whereas rural location (P < .01) and lacking community interest (P < .01) had a negative significant influence, controlling for race/ethnicity, region, total garden investment, and Community Need Index score (a proxy for socioeconomic status). Conclusions and Implications: Results indicate that success of school garden programs may be more difficult for the schools located in a rural area or in the absence of school or community-at-large interest. This study found that race/ethnicity of students and socioeconomic status are not related to success score, which is promising as other research indicates that successful school gardens may be especially impactful for low-income people of color. Causal research is needed to identify strategies that increase school garden success, with a focus on engaging key stakeholders (administrators, teachers, parents, the community at large, and garden coordinators).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1139-1149
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume51
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019

Fingerprint

Social Class
Gardens
Puerto Rico
Proxy
Budgets
Administrative Personnel
Research
Color
Parents
Regression Analysis
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Organizations
Students

Keywords

  • environmental education
  • farm-to-school
  • nutrition education
  • program implementation
  • school gardens

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

A Nationwide Snapshot of the Predictors of and Barriers to School Garden Success. / Burt, Kate G.; Lindel, Nicole; Wang, Jiayu; Burgermaster, Marissa; Fera, Joseph.

In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Vol. 51, No. 10, 01.11.2019, p. 1139-1149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burt, Kate G. ; Lindel, Nicole ; Wang, Jiayu ; Burgermaster, Marissa ; Fera, Joseph. / A Nationwide Snapshot of the Predictors of and Barriers to School Garden Success. In: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. 2019 ; Vol. 51, No. 10. pp. 1139-1149.
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