A qualitative analysis of advice from and for trainees with disabilities in professional psychology

Emily M. Lund, Erin Andrews, Judith M. Holt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is little empirical research on the experiences of professional psychology trainees with disabilities. This study qualitatively analyzed of the advice provided by psychologists and trainees with disabilities to those with similar disabilities. Participants were 41 psychologists (n = 24; 58.5%) and psychology trainees (n = 17; 41.5%) with disabilities who held or were pursuing a doctoral degree in clinical, counseling, school, combined, or rehabilitation psychology and who completed an online survey. The most common disabilities were physical, sensory, and chronic health disabilities, but participants with learning, psychiatric, and cognitive disabilities were also represented. Answers to an open-ended survey question about advice for current trainees with disabilities were coded using grounded theory techniques. Major themes were the importance of seeking support, resources, and mentorship; advocacy; accommodations; disability disclosure; encouragement; dissuasion; and general advice. Participants emphasized the importance of pursuing mentorship and support and encouraged self-advocacy during training but also cautioned of the possible negative repercussions of disability disclosure. Results suggested that trainees with disabilities face many challenges during training and that psychology training programs should actively work to create supportive and disability-affirmative environments for trainees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-213
Number of pages8
JournalTraining and Education in Professional Psychology
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

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trainee
psychology
disability
Psychology
Mentors
Disclosure
Empirical Research
psychologist
Psychiatry
Counseling
Rehabilitation
Learning
Education
physical disability
Health
online survey
grounded theory
accommodation
rehabilitation
training program

Keywords

  • Disability
  • Disclosure
  • Discrimination
  • Professional psychology
  • Psychology trainees

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

A qualitative analysis of advice from and for trainees with disabilities in professional psychology. / Lund, Emily M.; Andrews, Erin; Holt, Judith M.

In: Training and Education in Professional Psychology, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.11.2016, p. 206-213.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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