Adaptations of skeletal muscle to endurance exercise and their metabolic consequences

J. O. Holloszy, E. F. Coyle

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1217 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Regularly performed endurance exercise induces major adaptations in skeletal muscle. These include increases in the mitochondrial content and respiratory capacity of the muscle fibers. As a consequence of the increase in mitochondria, exercise of the same intensity results in a disturbance in homeostasis that is smaller in trained than in untrained muscles. The major metabolic consequences of the adaptations of muscle to endurance exercise are a slower utilization of muscle glycogen and blood glucose, a greater reliance on fat oxidation, and less lactate production during exercise of a given intensity. These adaptations play an important role in the large increase in the ability to perform prolonged strenuous exercise that occurs in response to endurance exercise training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)831-838
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology Respiratory Environmental and Exercise Physiology
Volume56
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

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Skeletal Muscle
Muscles
Respiratory Muscles
Glycogen
Blood Glucose
Lactic Acid
Mitochondria
Homeostasis
Fats
Exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Physiology

Cite this

Adaptations of skeletal muscle to endurance exercise and their metabolic consequences. / Holloszy, J. O.; Coyle, E. F.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology Respiratory Environmental and Exercise Physiology, Vol. 56, No. 4, 01.01.1984, p. 831-838.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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