Addressing parent-child functioning problems in veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder: Veterans affairs provider practices and perspectives

Suzannah Creech, Elaine K. Brown, Jeremy Saenz, John W. Kelley, Shelley R. Fenstermacher, Shirley M. Glynn, Susan J. McCutcheon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Calls to increase programming in the area of parent- child functioning for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder have been growing in recent years. This study examined Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) provider practices and beliefs regarding the provision of parent training interventions. Although parent training is not currently widespread across VA, many clinicians and facilities have been engaged in this work. An understanding of the experiences of these providers is critical to the success of future intervention development efforts. This study conducted qualitative interviews with 16 providers across the country who have been involved in parent training efforts within VA. The interviews revealed three themes: (1) Potential benefits and content of parent training interventions. (2) Challenges in veteran engagement. (3) Considerations for implementation. The potential benefits and content theme encompassed provider responses regarding the need for parent training at VA in general in addition to specific content domains that should be covered in such an intervention. The challenges for engagement theme encompassed comments regarding challenges to recruitment including identifying target populations for parenting groups. Considerations for implementation included barriers to implementation, positive secondary impacts, leadership support, justice involvement, and children's mental health problems. Results highlight many consistent content areas that providers recommended should be addressed in parent training interventions for veterans, as well common struggles that must be considered in further program development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)105-120
Number of pages16
JournalCouple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

Fingerprint

Veterans
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Interviews
Program Development
Health Services Needs and Demand
Parenting
Social Justice
Population Groups
Mental Health

Keywords

  • Implementation
  • Military
  • Parenting
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder
  • Veterans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Addressing parent-child functioning problems in veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder : Veterans affairs provider practices and perspectives. / Creech, Suzannah; Brown, Elaine K.; Saenz, Jeremy; Kelley, John W.; Fenstermacher, Shelley R.; Glynn, Shirley M.; McCutcheon, Susan J.

In: Couple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.06.2019, p. 105-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Creech, Suzannah ; Brown, Elaine K. ; Saenz, Jeremy ; Kelley, John W. ; Fenstermacher, Shelley R. ; Glynn, Shirley M. ; McCutcheon, Susan J. / Addressing parent-child functioning problems in veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder : Veterans affairs provider practices and perspectives. In: Couple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice. 2019 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 105-120.
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