Adolescent smoking susceptibility in the current tobacco context: 2014-2016

Olusegun Owotomo, Julie Maslowsky

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Objectives: We examined perceptions and behaviors associated with smoking susceptibility among adolescents in the current tobacco landscape. Methods: Participants were 8th and 10th grade never-smokers of conventional cigarettes (N = 19,853) from Monitoring the Future surveys (2014-2016). Using weighted multivariable logistic regression, we examined risk factors for smoking susceptibility: Alternative tobacco product use (e-cigarettes, large cigars, little cigars/cigarillos, and flavored little cigars/cigarillos), ownership of tobacco promotional items (TPIs), access to cigarettes, perceived influence of antismoking advertisements, and perceived addictiveness of conventional cigarette smoking. Results: Among never-smokers of conventional cigarettes, 16.7% were susceptible to smoking, 6.2% were past 30-day alternative tobacco product users, and 3.5% owned TPIs. Alternative tobacco product use, ownership of TPIs, and easy access to cigarettes were associated with increased likelihood of smoking susceptibility. Perceived great influence by antismoking ads and higher perceived addictiveness of conventional cigarette smoking were associated with lower odds of smoking susceptibility. Conclusion: Alternative tobacco product use, ownership of TPIs, easy access to cigarettes, low influence by antismoking ads, and low perceptions of the addictiveness of conventional cigarettes are significant and actionable risk factors for smoking susceptibility among today's adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-113
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Behavior
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Fingerprint

Tobacco Products
nicotine
Tobacco
smoking
Smoking
adolescent
Health Promotion
Ownership
Tobacco Use
school grade
logistics
monitoring
regression
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Access restriction
  • Addictiveness
  • Antismoking ads
  • E-cigarette use
  • Smoking susceptibility
  • Tobacco promotional items

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Adolescent smoking susceptibility in the current tobacco context : 2014-2016. / Owotomo, Olusegun; Maslowsky, Julie.

In: American Journal of Health Behavior, Vol. 42, No. 3, 01.05.2018, p. 102-113.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Owotomo, Olusegun ; Maslowsky, Julie. / Adolescent smoking susceptibility in the current tobacco context : 2014-2016. In: American Journal of Health Behavior. 2018 ; Vol. 42, No. 3. pp. 102-113.
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