An initial investigation of the reliability and validity of the Compensatory Cognitive Strategies Scale

Heather Becker, Alexa K. Stuifbergen, Ashley Henneghan, Janet Morrison, Eun Jin Seo, Wenhui Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Although many cognitive performance tests and self-reported cognitive concerns scales have been used to evaluate cognitive functioning, fewer measures assess the use of compensatory cognitive strategies for daily activities among those experiencing mild levels of cognitive impairment. The Compensatory Cognitive Strategies Scale was developed to measure frequency of self-reported cognitive strategies to decrease distractions, organise and sequence activities, and to utilise newly available computer aids to assist memory among those with multiple sclerosis (MS). Cronbach’s alpha, a measure of internal consistency reliability, was.89 and.90 in two different samples. Concurrent validity was supported by the total score’s moderate correlation with the MMQ-Strategy Scale (r s =.67) and by a statistically significant increase in total scores for those who had participated in an intervention designed to improve their cognitive abilities. Correlations were stronger with another strategy measure than with measures of other constructs such as health-promoting behaviours, thus supporting the scales convergent versus divergent validity. These initial findings suggest that the Compensatory Cognitive Strategies Scale may be useful to both researchers and clinicians working to build compensatory strategies for day-to-day functioning among those with mild cognitive impairment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)739-753
Number of pages15
JournalNeuropsychological Rehabilitation
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 28 2019

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Reproducibility of Results
Aptitude
Multiple Sclerosis
Research Personnel
Health
Cognitive Dysfunction
Cognitive Strategies

Keywords

  • Cognitive strategies measure
  • multiple sclerosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Rehabilitation
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

An initial investigation of the reliability and validity of the Compensatory Cognitive Strategies Scale. / Becker, Heather; Stuifbergen, Alexa K.; Henneghan, Ashley; Morrison, Janet; Seo, Eun Jin; Zhang, Wenhui.

In: Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, Vol. 29, No. 5, 28.05.2019, p. 739-753.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Becker, Heather ; Stuifbergen, Alexa K. ; Henneghan, Ashley ; Morrison, Janet ; Seo, Eun Jin ; Zhang, Wenhui. / An initial investigation of the reliability and validity of the Compensatory Cognitive Strategies Scale. In: Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. 2019 ; Vol. 29, No. 5. pp. 739-753.
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