An investigation into the challenges of using metal additive manufacturing for the production of patient-specific aneurysm clips

Brandon J. Walker, Benjamin L. Cox, Ulas Cikla, Gabriel Meric De Bellefon, Behzad Rankouhi, Leo J. Steiner, Puwadej Mahadumrongkul, George Petry, Mythili Thevamaran, Rob Swader, John Kuo, Krishnan Suresh, Dan Thoma, Kevin W. Eliceiri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cerebral aneurysm clips are biomedical implants applied by neurosurgeons to re-approximate arterial vessel walls and prevent catastrophic aneurysmal hemorrhages in patients. Current methods of aneurysm clip production are labor intensive and time-consuming, leading to high costs per implant and limited variability in clip morphology. Metal additive manufacturing is investigated as an alternative to traditional manufacturing methods that may enable production of patient-specific aneurysm clips to account for variations in individual vascular anatomy and possibly reduce surgical complication risks. Relevant challenges to metal additive manufacturing are investigated for biomedical implants, including material choice, design limitations, postprocessing, printed material properties, and combined production methods. Initial experiments with additive manufacturing of 316 L stainless steel aneurysm clips are carried out on a selective laser melting (SLM) system. The dimensions of the printed clips were found to be within 0.5% of the dimensions of the designed clips. Hardness and density of the printed clips (213 ± 7 HV1 and 7.9 g/cc, respectively) were very close to reported values for 316 L stainless steel, as expected. No ferrite and minimal porosity is observed in a cross section of a printed clip, with some anisotropy in the grain orientation. A clamping force of approximately 1 N is measured with a clip separation of 1.5 mm. Metal additive manufacturing shows promise for use in the creation of custom aneurysm clips, but some of the challenges discussed will need to be addressed before clinical use is possible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number031009
JournalJournal of Medical Devices, Transactions of the ASME
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019

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3D printers
Surgical Instruments
Aneurysm
Metals
Stainless steel
Ferrite
Materials properties
Stainless Steel
Melting
Anisotropy
Porosity
Hardness
Personnel
Lasers
Costs
Intracranial Aneurysm
Experiments
Constriction
Freezing
Blood Vessels

Keywords

  • 3D printing
  • aneurysm clip(s)
  • medical devices
  • metal additive manufacturing
  • neurosurgery
  • patient-specific devices

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

An investigation into the challenges of using metal additive manufacturing for the production of patient-specific aneurysm clips. / Walker, Brandon J.; Cox, Benjamin L.; Cikla, Ulas; De Bellefon, Gabriel Meric; Rankouhi, Behzad; Steiner, Leo J.; Mahadumrongkul, Puwadej; Petry, George; Thevamaran, Mythili; Swader, Rob; Kuo, John; Suresh, Krishnan; Thoma, Dan; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

In: Journal of Medical Devices, Transactions of the ASME, Vol. 13, No. 3, 031009, 01.09.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Walker, BJ, Cox, BL, Cikla, U, De Bellefon, GM, Rankouhi, B, Steiner, LJ, Mahadumrongkul, P, Petry, G, Thevamaran, M, Swader, R, Kuo, J, Suresh, K, Thoma, D & Eliceiri, KW 2019, 'An investigation into the challenges of using metal additive manufacturing for the production of patient-specific aneurysm clips', Journal of Medical Devices, Transactions of the ASME, vol. 13, no. 3, 031009. https://doi.org/10.1115/1.4043651
Walker, Brandon J. ; Cox, Benjamin L. ; Cikla, Ulas ; De Bellefon, Gabriel Meric ; Rankouhi, Behzad ; Steiner, Leo J. ; Mahadumrongkul, Puwadej ; Petry, George ; Thevamaran, Mythili ; Swader, Rob ; Kuo, John ; Suresh, Krishnan ; Thoma, Dan ; Eliceiri, Kevin W. / An investigation into the challenges of using metal additive manufacturing for the production of patient-specific aneurysm clips. In: Journal of Medical Devices, Transactions of the ASME. 2019 ; Vol. 13, No. 3.
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