Anger and aggression in PTSD

Casey T. Taft, Suzannah Creech, Christopher M. Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder have massive negative consequences; associated anger and aggression are particularly damaging. This overview focuses on these relationships and their potential mechanisms, and offers treatment considerations. Research and theory suggests that trauma impacts anger and aggression through social information processing mechanisms, and an aggression model incorporating impelling, instigating, and disinhibiting factors helps us understand who is at risk under specific circumstances. The association between PTSD and anger and aggression appears stronger for men than women, perhaps reflecting differences in internalizing versus externalizing responses to trauma. Some research indicates that intervention for those with PTSD and anger/aggression problems is effective, and recent studies indicate the benefits of trauma-informed violence prevention for trauma-exposed populations more broadly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-71
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Psychology
Volume14
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

Anger
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Aggression
Wounds and Injuries
Automatic Data Processing
Research
Violence
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Anger and aggression in PTSD. / Taft, Casey T.; Creech, Suzannah; Murphy, Christopher M.

In: Current Opinion in Psychology, Vol. 14, 01.04.2017, p. 67-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Taft, Casey T. ; Creech, Suzannah ; Murphy, Christopher M. / Anger and aggression in PTSD. In: Current Opinion in Psychology. 2017 ; Vol. 14. pp. 67-71.
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