Association between Delusions of Infestation and Prescribed Narcotic and Stimulant Use

Tian Hao Zhu, Isela A. Werchan, Kristin V. Escamilla, Katherine Sebastian, Collin A. Hovinga, Jason S. Reichenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Patients diagnosed with delusions of infestation (DOI) at a psychodermatology clinic appeared to have a higher incidence of being prescribed narcotic or stimulant medications compared with the general dermatologic clinic population with chronic pruritic conditions. A retrospective study was conducted examining the correlation between patients with DOI and prescribed psychoactive medications.Methods:Ninety-two patients with a diagnosis of DOI, seen at our University Psychodermatology Clinic, served as the study population. The comparison group (N=354) included dermatology patients seen at a dermatology clinic by the same dermatologist for itching, including adults seen for chronic pruritic conditions and contact dermatitis. For both groups, the reported use of any psychoactive prescription medications was noted.Results:Patients with DOI were significantly more likely than other dermatology patients to receive prescriptions for narcotics [adjusted odds ratio (OR)=2.19; confidence interval (CI)=1.21-3.99) and stimulants (OR=5.44; CI=2.37-12.52). Patients with DOI were also more likely to be female (OR=2.49; CI=1.47-4.22) than patients who did not have such delusions.Discussion:Few data are available concerning the etiology and management of DOI. Findings from this study indicated an association between the diagnosis of DOI and the prescribing of narcotics and stimulants, even when sex and age were taken into account. This information may be used to assist with the diagnosis of patients presenting with DOI and possible treatment options. It will be important to determine if these medications are a cause of the condition, or are merely correlated with other medical conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)428-431
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of psychiatric practice
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Fingerprint

Delusions
Narcotics
Dermatology
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Prescriptions
Contact Dermatitis
Pruritus
Population
Retrospective Studies
Incidence

Keywords

  • delusion
  • delusional parasitosis
  • drug
  • infestation
  • narcotic
  • stimulant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Association between Delusions of Infestation and Prescribed Narcotic and Stimulant Use. / Zhu, Tian Hao; Werchan, Isela A.; Escamilla, Kristin V.; Sebastian, Katherine; Hovinga, Collin A.; Reichenberg, Jason S.

In: Journal of psychiatric practice, Vol. 24, No. 6, 01.11.2018, p. 428-431.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Zhu, Tian Hao ; Werchan, Isela A. ; Escamilla, Kristin V. ; Sebastian, Katherine ; Hovinga, Collin A. ; Reichenberg, Jason S. / Association between Delusions of Infestation and Prescribed Narcotic and Stimulant Use. In: Journal of psychiatric practice. 2018 ; Vol. 24, No. 6. pp. 428-431.
@article{0e0a8fac98ee4517b87e8fb4f414b58c,
title = "Association between Delusions of Infestation and Prescribed Narcotic and Stimulant Use",
abstract = "Patients diagnosed with delusions of infestation (DOI) at a psychodermatology clinic appeared to have a higher incidence of being prescribed narcotic or stimulant medications compared with the general dermatologic clinic population with chronic pruritic conditions. A retrospective study was conducted examining the correlation between patients with DOI and prescribed psychoactive medications.Methods:Ninety-two patients with a diagnosis of DOI, seen at our University Psychodermatology Clinic, served as the study population. The comparison group (N=354) included dermatology patients seen at a dermatology clinic by the same dermatologist for itching, including adults seen for chronic pruritic conditions and contact dermatitis. For both groups, the reported use of any psychoactive prescription medications was noted.Results:Patients with DOI were significantly more likely than other dermatology patients to receive prescriptions for narcotics [adjusted odds ratio (OR)=2.19; confidence interval (CI)=1.21-3.99) and stimulants (OR=5.44; CI=2.37-12.52). Patients with DOI were also more likely to be female (OR=2.49; CI=1.47-4.22) than patients who did not have such delusions.Discussion:Few data are available concerning the etiology and management of DOI. Findings from this study indicated an association between the diagnosis of DOI and the prescribing of narcotics and stimulants, even when sex and age were taken into account. This information may be used to assist with the diagnosis of patients presenting with DOI and possible treatment options. It will be important to determine if these medications are a cause of the condition, or are merely correlated with other medical conditions.",
keywords = "delusion, delusional parasitosis, drug, infestation, narcotic, stimulant",
author = "Zhu, {Tian Hao} and Werchan, {Isela A.} and Escamilla, {Kristin V.} and Katherine Sebastian and Hovinga, {Collin A.} and Reichenberg, {Jason S.}",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/PRA.0000000000000338",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "428--431",
journal = "Journal of Psychiatric Practice",
issn = "1527-4160",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between Delusions of Infestation and Prescribed Narcotic and Stimulant Use

AU - Zhu, Tian Hao

AU - Werchan, Isela A.

AU - Escamilla, Kristin V.

AU - Sebastian, Katherine

AU - Hovinga, Collin A.

AU - Reichenberg, Jason S.

PY - 2018/11/1

Y1 - 2018/11/1

N2 - Patients diagnosed with delusions of infestation (DOI) at a psychodermatology clinic appeared to have a higher incidence of being prescribed narcotic or stimulant medications compared with the general dermatologic clinic population with chronic pruritic conditions. A retrospective study was conducted examining the correlation between patients with DOI and prescribed psychoactive medications.Methods:Ninety-two patients with a diagnosis of DOI, seen at our University Psychodermatology Clinic, served as the study population. The comparison group (N=354) included dermatology patients seen at a dermatology clinic by the same dermatologist for itching, including adults seen for chronic pruritic conditions and contact dermatitis. For both groups, the reported use of any psychoactive prescription medications was noted.Results:Patients with DOI were significantly more likely than other dermatology patients to receive prescriptions for narcotics [adjusted odds ratio (OR)=2.19; confidence interval (CI)=1.21-3.99) and stimulants (OR=5.44; CI=2.37-12.52). Patients with DOI were also more likely to be female (OR=2.49; CI=1.47-4.22) than patients who did not have such delusions.Discussion:Few data are available concerning the etiology and management of DOI. Findings from this study indicated an association between the diagnosis of DOI and the prescribing of narcotics and stimulants, even when sex and age were taken into account. This information may be used to assist with the diagnosis of patients presenting with DOI and possible treatment options. It will be important to determine if these medications are a cause of the condition, or are merely correlated with other medical conditions.

AB - Patients diagnosed with delusions of infestation (DOI) at a psychodermatology clinic appeared to have a higher incidence of being prescribed narcotic or stimulant medications compared with the general dermatologic clinic population with chronic pruritic conditions. A retrospective study was conducted examining the correlation between patients with DOI and prescribed psychoactive medications.Methods:Ninety-two patients with a diagnosis of DOI, seen at our University Psychodermatology Clinic, served as the study population. The comparison group (N=354) included dermatology patients seen at a dermatology clinic by the same dermatologist for itching, including adults seen for chronic pruritic conditions and contact dermatitis. For both groups, the reported use of any psychoactive prescription medications was noted.Results:Patients with DOI were significantly more likely than other dermatology patients to receive prescriptions for narcotics [adjusted odds ratio (OR)=2.19; confidence interval (CI)=1.21-3.99) and stimulants (OR=5.44; CI=2.37-12.52). Patients with DOI were also more likely to be female (OR=2.49; CI=1.47-4.22) than patients who did not have such delusions.Discussion:Few data are available concerning the etiology and management of DOI. Findings from this study indicated an association between the diagnosis of DOI and the prescribing of narcotics and stimulants, even when sex and age were taken into account. This information may be used to assist with the diagnosis of patients presenting with DOI and possible treatment options. It will be important to determine if these medications are a cause of the condition, or are merely correlated with other medical conditions.

KW - delusion

KW - delusional parasitosis

KW - drug

KW - infestation

KW - narcotic

KW - stimulant

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85056262371&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85056262371&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/PRA.0000000000000338

DO - 10.1097/PRA.0000000000000338

M3 - Review article

C2 - 30395552

AN - SCOPUS:85056262371

VL - 24

SP - 428

EP - 431

JO - Journal of Psychiatric Practice

JF - Journal of Psychiatric Practice

SN - 1527-4160

IS - 6

ER -