Association between sleep and serious psychological distress in patients with diabetes

Ya Ching Huang, Julie A. Zuñiga, Alexandra Garcia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S. and impacts patients’ physical health and also increases the risk for psychological distress. Sleep disturbance is a common complaint in patients with diabetes and likely impacts psychological well-being. This study examined the relationship between sleep characteristics and serious psychological distress (SPD) in people with diabetes by conducting a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from the 2015 National Health Interview Survey (N= 3474). Approximately 7% of the participants reported SPD and 27% reported sleep durations that were shorter or longer than the recommended 6-8 hours daily. Hierarchical logistic regression analysis showed that people who reported daily sleep of 1-5 hours or 9 or more hours were more likely to report SPD than individuals who slept 6-8 hours a day. Respondents who reported a higher frequency of taking medication for sleep and having trouble staying asleep were also substantially more likely to have SPD. However, an increase in the number of days feeling rested when waking up was a protective factor that decreased the risk of SPD. The findings suggest that both sleep disturbances and SPD, because of their high prevalence, should be included in the routine evaluation for diabetes care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)925-935
Number of pages11
JournalPsychology, Health and Medicine
Volume24
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 14 2019

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Sleep
Psychology
Health Surveys
Cause of Death
Emotions
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Interviews
Health

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)
  • mental distress
  • serious psychological distress (SPD)
  • sleep disturbance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Association between sleep and serious psychological distress in patients with diabetes. / Huang, Ya Ching; Zuñiga, Julie A.; Garcia, Alexandra.

In: Psychology, Health and Medicine, Vol. 24, No. 8, 14.09.2019, p. 925-935.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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