Biophysical basis of skin cancer margin assessment using Raman spectroscopy

Xu Feng, Matthew C. Fox, Jason S. Reichenberg, Fabiana C.P.S. Lopes, Katherine R. Sebastian, Mia K. Markey, James W. Tunnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Achieving adequate margins during tumor margin resection is critical to minimize the recurrence rate and maximize positive patient outcomes during skin cancer surgery. Although Mohs micrographic surgery is by far the most effective method to treat nonmelanoma skin cancer, it can be limited by its inherent required infrastructure, including time-consuming and expensive on-site histopathology. Previous studies have demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy can accurately detect basal cell carcinoma (BCC) from surrounding normal tissue; however, the biophysical basis of the detection remained unclear. Therefore, we aim to explore the relevant Raman biomarkers to guide BCC margin resection. Raman imaging was performed on skin tissue samples from 30 patients undergoing Mohs surgery. High correlations were found between the histopathology and Raman images for BCC and primary normal structures (including epidermis, dermis, inflamed dermis, hair follicle, hair shaft, sebaceous gland and fat). A previously developed model was used to extract the biochemical changes associated with malignancy. Our results showed that BCC had a significantly different concentration of nucleus, keratin, collagen, triolein and ceramide compared to normal structures. The nucleus accounted for most of the discriminant power (90% sensitivity, 92% specificity – balanced approach). Our findings suggest that Raman spectroscopy is a promising surgical guidance tool for identifying tumors in the resection margins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-118
Number of pages15
JournalBiomedical Optics Express
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Raman Spectrum Analysis
Basal Cell Carcinoma
Skin Neoplasms
margins
Raman spectroscopy
cancer
Mohs Surgery
Dermis
surgery
hair
Dermatologic Surgical Procedures
Triolein
Sebaceous Glands
Neoplasms
sebaceous glands
Hair Follicle
Ceramides
tumors
Keratins
Epidermis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Biophysical basis of skin cancer margin assessment using Raman spectroscopy. / Feng, Xu; Fox, Matthew C.; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Lopes, Fabiana C.P.S.; Sebastian, Katherine R.; Markey, Mia K.; Tunnell, James W.

In: Biomedical Optics Express, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 104-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2211c1e018934f33a7c5158dbef6f31f,
title = "Biophysical basis of skin cancer margin assessment using Raman spectroscopy",
abstract = "Achieving adequate margins during tumor margin resection is critical to minimize the recurrence rate and maximize positive patient outcomes during skin cancer surgery. Although Mohs micrographic surgery is by far the most effective method to treat nonmelanoma skin cancer, it can be limited by its inherent required infrastructure, including time-consuming and expensive on-site histopathology. Previous studies have demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy can accurately detect basal cell carcinoma (BCC) from surrounding normal tissue; however, the biophysical basis of the detection remained unclear. Therefore, we aim to explore the relevant Raman biomarkers to guide BCC margin resection. Raman imaging was performed on skin tissue samples from 30 patients undergoing Mohs surgery. High correlations were found between the histopathology and Raman images for BCC and primary normal structures (including epidermis, dermis, inflamed dermis, hair follicle, hair shaft, sebaceous gland and fat). A previously developed model was used to extract the biochemical changes associated with malignancy. Our results showed that BCC had a significantly different concentration of nucleus, keratin, collagen, triolein and ceramide compared to normal structures. The nucleus accounted for most of the discriminant power (90{\%} sensitivity, 92{\%} specificity – balanced approach). Our findings suggest that Raman spectroscopy is a promising surgical guidance tool for identifying tumors in the resection margins.",
author = "Xu Feng and Fox, {Matthew C.} and Reichenberg, {Jason S.} and Lopes, {Fabiana C.P.S.} and Sebastian, {Katherine R.} and Markey, {Mia K.} and Tunnell, {James W.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1364/BOE.10.000104",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "104--118",
journal = "Biomedical Optics Express",
issn = "2156-7085",
publisher = "The Optical Society",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Biophysical basis of skin cancer margin assessment using Raman spectroscopy

AU - Feng, Xu

AU - Fox, Matthew C.

AU - Reichenberg, Jason S.

AU - Lopes, Fabiana C.P.S.

AU - Sebastian, Katherine R.

AU - Markey, Mia K.

AU - Tunnell, James W.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Achieving adequate margins during tumor margin resection is critical to minimize the recurrence rate and maximize positive patient outcomes during skin cancer surgery. Although Mohs micrographic surgery is by far the most effective method to treat nonmelanoma skin cancer, it can be limited by its inherent required infrastructure, including time-consuming and expensive on-site histopathology. Previous studies have demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy can accurately detect basal cell carcinoma (BCC) from surrounding normal tissue; however, the biophysical basis of the detection remained unclear. Therefore, we aim to explore the relevant Raman biomarkers to guide BCC margin resection. Raman imaging was performed on skin tissue samples from 30 patients undergoing Mohs surgery. High correlations were found between the histopathology and Raman images for BCC and primary normal structures (including epidermis, dermis, inflamed dermis, hair follicle, hair shaft, sebaceous gland and fat). A previously developed model was used to extract the biochemical changes associated with malignancy. Our results showed that BCC had a significantly different concentration of nucleus, keratin, collagen, triolein and ceramide compared to normal structures. The nucleus accounted for most of the discriminant power (90% sensitivity, 92% specificity – balanced approach). Our findings suggest that Raman spectroscopy is a promising surgical guidance tool for identifying tumors in the resection margins.

AB - Achieving adequate margins during tumor margin resection is critical to minimize the recurrence rate and maximize positive patient outcomes during skin cancer surgery. Although Mohs micrographic surgery is by far the most effective method to treat nonmelanoma skin cancer, it can be limited by its inherent required infrastructure, including time-consuming and expensive on-site histopathology. Previous studies have demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy can accurately detect basal cell carcinoma (BCC) from surrounding normal tissue; however, the biophysical basis of the detection remained unclear. Therefore, we aim to explore the relevant Raman biomarkers to guide BCC margin resection. Raman imaging was performed on skin tissue samples from 30 patients undergoing Mohs surgery. High correlations were found between the histopathology and Raman images for BCC and primary normal structures (including epidermis, dermis, inflamed dermis, hair follicle, hair shaft, sebaceous gland and fat). A previously developed model was used to extract the biochemical changes associated with malignancy. Our results showed that BCC had a significantly different concentration of nucleus, keratin, collagen, triolein and ceramide compared to normal structures. The nucleus accounted for most of the discriminant power (90% sensitivity, 92% specificity – balanced approach). Our findings suggest that Raman spectroscopy is a promising surgical guidance tool for identifying tumors in the resection margins.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061538056&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85061538056&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1364/BOE.10.000104

DO - 10.1364/BOE.10.000104

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85061538056

VL - 10

SP - 104

EP - 118

JO - Biomedical Optics Express

JF - Biomedical Optics Express

SN - 2156-7085

IS - 1

ER -