Case logging habits among general surgery residents are discordant and inconsistent

Brittany Bankhead-Kendall, Carlos VR Brown, Ruth Gerola, Eliza Slama, Alexa Ryder, John Uecker, John Falcone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: General surgery residents log operative case experience as “first assist” (FA) or “primary surgeon” (PS). This study will evaluate their quantitative and qualitative case log practices. Methods: Modified Delphi technique was used to create a questionnaire and distributed online to institutions via the APDS. Descriptive analyses and example operative scenarios for resident case logging habits were ascertained. Results: There were 363 residents from university (60%) and non-university (40%) programs; 94% did not know the definition of primary surgeon. Over 50% stated they had been encouraged to log a case as surgeon that they did not feel was warranted. Only 4% felt the current logging system is “very accurate.” Given an operative scenario, residents varied how they chose to log the case. Conclusion: General surgery residents do not know the current definition of PS. Case logging should be an objective measure of resident operative exposure, but may actually be more complex than previously recognized.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Habits
Delphi Technique
Surgeons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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Case logging habits among general surgery residents are discordant and inconsistent. / Bankhead-Kendall, Brittany; Brown, Carlos VR; Gerola, Ruth; Slama, Eliza; Ryder, Alexa; Uecker, John; Falcone, John.

In: American Journal of Surgery, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bankhead-Kendall, Brittany ; Brown, Carlos VR ; Gerola, Ruth ; Slama, Eliza ; Ryder, Alexa ; Uecker, John ; Falcone, John. / Case logging habits among general surgery residents are discordant and inconsistent. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2019.
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