Characterizing population exposure to coal emissions sources in the United States using the HyADS model

Lucas R.F. Henneman, Christine Choirat, Cesunica Ivey, Kevin Cummiskey, Corwin Zigler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In anticipation of the expanding appreciation for air quality models in health outcomes studies, we develop and evaluate a reduced-complexity model for pollution transport that intentionally sacrifices some of the sophistication of full-scale chemical transport models in order to support applicability to a wider range of health studies. Specifically, we introduce the HYSPLIT average dispersion model, HyADS, which combines the HYSPLIT trajectory dispersion model with modern advances in parallel computing to estimate ZIP code level exposure to emissions from individual coal-powered electricity generating units in the United States. Importantly, the method is not designed to reproduce ambient concentrations of any particular air pollutant; rather, the primary goal is to characterize each ZIP code's exposure to these coal power plants specifically. We show adequate performance towards this goal against observed annual average air pollutant concentrations (nationwide Pearson correlations of 0.88 and 0.73 with SO42− and PM2.5, respectively) and coal-combustion impacts simulated with a full-scale chemical transport model and adjusted to observations using a hybrid direct sensitivities approach (correlation of 0.90). We proceed to provide multiple examples of HyADS's single-source applicability, including to show that 22% of the population-weighted coal exposure comes from 30 coal-powered electricity generating units.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)271-280
Number of pages10
JournalAtmospheric Environment
Volume203
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2019

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coal
electricity
parallel computing
emission source
exposure
power plant
air quality
trajectory
pollution
code
health
air pollutant
chemical

Keywords

  • Air pollution exposure
  • HYSPLIT
  • PM
  • Reduced complexity model
  • Source impacts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

Characterizing population exposure to coal emissions sources in the United States using the HyADS model. / Henneman, Lucas R.F.; Choirat, Christine; Ivey, Cesunica; Cummiskey, Kevin; Zigler, Corwin.

In: Atmospheric Environment, Vol. 203, 15.04.2019, p. 271-280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Henneman, Lucas R.F. ; Choirat, Christine ; Ivey, Cesunica ; Cummiskey, Kevin ; Zigler, Corwin. / Characterizing population exposure to coal emissions sources in the United States using the HyADS model. In: Atmospheric Environment. 2019 ; Vol. 203. pp. 271-280.
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