Cognitive behavioral therapy for primary care depression and anxiety: a secondary meta-analytic review using robust variance estimation in meta-regression

Anao Zhang, Lindsay A. Borhneimer, Addie Weaver, Cynthia Franklin, Audrey Hang Hai, Samantha Guz, Li Shen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is well supported for treating depressive and anxiety disorders. Trials of CBT for anxiety and depression in primary care have increased over the past decade, yet only one meta-analysis, published in 2015, examined this topic and the scope of that review is relatively narrow. This study conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of primary care based CBT for depression and anxiety. A search of seven electronic databases, six professional websites, and reference lists from articles meeting inclusion criteria was conducted for studies published between 1900 and November 2018. Fifty-seven eligible studies (including 10,701 participants; 221 effect sizes) of randomized controlled trials were eligible and included for meta-analysis using robust variance estimation in meta-regression. Outcome indicators were depression and anxiety measures. An overall significant treatment effect, d = 0.400, 95% CI (0.235, 0.566), p < 0.001, of CBT for depression and anxiety disorders in primary care was identified. Subgroup analyses indicated significant treatment effect for: (1) depressive (d = 0.425, p < 0.001) and anxiety (d = 0.393, p < 0.01) outcomes, (2) studies conducted inside primary care (d = 0.412, p < 0.001), (3) studies using individual-based CBT (d = 0.412, p < 0.001), (4) studies without primary care physician involvement (d = 0.395, p < 0.001), and (5) studies using both tele-health (d = 0.563, p < 0.001) and in-person CBT (d = 0.363, p < 0.001). The percentage of White participants, treatment composition (CBT only versus CBT + other approaches), and treatment duration were significant moderators. Implications for clinical practice are discussed based on both moderator and subgroup analysis results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1117-1141
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

Fingerprint

Cognitive Therapy
Primary Health Care
Anxiety
Depression
Meta-Analysis
Anxiety Disorders
Primary Care Physicians
Therapeutics
Depressive Disorder
Randomized Controlled Trials
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Databases
Health

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Depression
  • Meta-analysis
  • Primary care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Cognitive behavioral therapy for primary care depression and anxiety : a secondary meta-analytic review using robust variance estimation in meta-regression. / Zhang, Anao; Borhneimer, Lindsay A.; Weaver, Addie; Franklin, Cynthia; Hai, Audrey Hang; Guz, Samantha; Shen, Li.

In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 42, No. 6, 01.12.2019, p. 1117-1141.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Zhang, Anao ; Borhneimer, Lindsay A. ; Weaver, Addie ; Franklin, Cynthia ; Hai, Audrey Hang ; Guz, Samantha ; Shen, Li. / Cognitive behavioral therapy for primary care depression and anxiety : a secondary meta-analytic review using robust variance estimation in meta-regression. In: Journal of Behavioral Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 42, No. 6. pp. 1117-1141.
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