Correlates of Early Pharyngeal High-Resolution Manometry Adoption in Expert Speech-Language Pathologists

Corinne A. Jones, Angela L. Forgues, Nicole M. Rogus-Pulia, Jason Orne, Cameron L. Macdonald, Nadine P. Connor, Timothy M. McCulloch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Pharyngeal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is at a point of entry into speech-language pathologist (SLP) clinical practice. However, the demographic characteristics of SLPs who are early adopters of HRM are unclear; perspectives of early adopters may shape how the technology is received by the field at large. We hypothesized that younger SLPs, those working in outpatient settings, those with a strong knowledge base in HRM, and those with experience in other types of instrumentation are more likely to have interest in adopting HRM. We surveyed the population of board-certified SLPs (BCS-S; n = 262) with a 33% response rate (n = 78). Firth logistic regression was used to determine differences in those expressing interest in adopting HRM into future practice (n = 28) and those who did not (n = 45) from the analytic sample of 73 respondents. The best fitting model predicted that SLPs: (1) with training in more types of instrumentation; and (2) believing they could explain the HRM procedure to a patient were more likely to plan to adopt pharyngeal HRM into regular clinical practice. Experience with a variety of instrumentation techniques may encourage SLPs to use new forms of technology. Knowledge of early adopter demographics will allow for development of targeted trainings and determination of HRM implementation barriers. Identification of a clinician sub-group more likely to adopt other new technologies in the future may also be possible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-332
Number of pages8
JournalDysphagia
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2019

Fingerprint

Manometry
Language
Technology
Demography
Knowledge Bases
Pathologists
Outpatients
Logistic Models
Population

Keywords

  • Deglutition
  • High-resolution manometry
  • Instrumentation
  • Speech-language pathologist
  • Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Jones, C. A., Forgues, A. L., Rogus-Pulia, N. M., Orne, J., Macdonald, C. L., Connor, N. P., & McCulloch, T. M. (2019). Correlates of Early Pharyngeal High-Resolution Manometry Adoption in Expert Speech-Language Pathologists. Dysphagia, 34(3), 325-332. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00455-018-9941-4

Correlates of Early Pharyngeal High-Resolution Manometry Adoption in Expert Speech-Language Pathologists. / Jones, Corinne A.; Forgues, Angela L.; Rogus-Pulia, Nicole M.; Orne, Jason; Macdonald, Cameron L.; Connor, Nadine P.; McCulloch, Timothy M.

In: Dysphagia, Vol. 34, No. 3, 15.06.2019, p. 325-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jones, CA, Forgues, AL, Rogus-Pulia, NM, Orne, J, Macdonald, CL, Connor, NP & McCulloch, TM 2019, 'Correlates of Early Pharyngeal High-Resolution Manometry Adoption in Expert Speech-Language Pathologists', Dysphagia, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 325-332. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00455-018-9941-4
Jones, Corinne A. ; Forgues, Angela L. ; Rogus-Pulia, Nicole M. ; Orne, Jason ; Macdonald, Cameron L. ; Connor, Nadine P. ; McCulloch, Timothy M. / Correlates of Early Pharyngeal High-Resolution Manometry Adoption in Expert Speech-Language Pathologists. In: Dysphagia. 2019 ; Vol. 34, No. 3. pp. 325-332.
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