Crowdsourcing Bike Share Station Locations: Evaluating Participation and Placement

Greg P. Griffin, Junfeng Jiao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Problem, research strategy, and findings: Planners increasingly involve stakeholders in co-producing vital planning information by crowdsourcing data using online map-based commenting platforms. Few studies, however, investigate the role and impact of such online platforms on planning outcomes. We evaluate the impact of participant input via a public participation geographic information system (PPGIS), a platform to suggest the placement of new bike share stations in New York City (NY) and Chicago (IL). We conducted 2 analyses to evaluate how close planners built new bike share stations to those suggested on PPGIS platforms. According to our proximity analysis, only a small percentage of built stations were within 100 feet (30 m) of suggested stations, but our geospatial analysis showed a substantial clustering of suggested and built stations in both cities that was not likely due to random distribution. We found that the PPGIS platforms have great promise for creating genuine co-production of planning knowledge and insights and that system planners did take account of the suggestions offered online. We did not, however, interview planners in either system, and both cities may be atypical, as is bike share planning; moreover, multiple factors influence where bike stations can be located, so not all suggested stations could be built. Takeaway for practice: Planners can use PPGIS and similar platforms to help stakeholders learn by doing and to increase their own local knowledge to improve planning outcomes. Planners should work to develop better online participatory systems and to allow stakeholders to provide more and better data, continuing to evaluate PPGIS efforts to improve the transparency and legitimacy of online public involvement processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-48
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of the American Planning Association
Volume85
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2019

Fingerprint

information system
planning
participation
stakeholder
coproduction
transparency
legitimacy
traditional knowledge
station
geographic information system
public participation
interview
city
analysis

Keywords

  • PPGIS
  • bike share
  • co-production
  • crowdsourcing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Crowdsourcing Bike Share Station Locations : Evaluating Participation and Placement. / Griffin, Greg P.; Jiao, Junfeng.

In: Journal of the American Planning Association, Vol. 85, No. 1, 02.01.2019, p. 35-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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