Demonstrating higher incidence of advanced breast malignancies in our young hispanic population

Amanda Klein, Michael Villareal, Sepeadeh Radpour, Boone Goodgame, Sadia Ali, Adam Clark, John Uecker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Historically, the Hispanic population in the United States has had a lower incidence of cancer than the matched non-Hispanic population, despite disparities in access to health care, screening, and prevention. Our experience in Austin, Texas, directly contradicts this. We have seen a disproportionate amount of young Hispanic patients with advanced malignancies, particularly of the breast. The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of advanced breast malignancies. We performed a retrospective review over a 10-year period (2003-2013) of all newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. Data were collected from the cancer registry. Patients were divided into two groups: Hispanic versus non-Hispanic descent, with a subgroup of those aged less than 50 years. Primary outcome was the incidence of advanced cancers (stage 3 or 4). There were a total of 3968 breast cancer patients seen in our Shivers Cancer Center from 2003 to 2013, with an overall incidence of advanced breast cancer of 11.5 per cent. Of the patients aged less than 50 years, 14.2 per cent had advanced breast cancer. However, the rate among Hispanic patients was 21.3 per cent, whereas in non-Hispanic patients it was 13.5 per cent, P 5 0.002. Being Hispanic was found to be an independent predictor of having advanced malignancies at a young age (odds ratio 1.7, confidence interval 1.1-2.5, P 5 0.01). Here in Austin, Texas, we have found a higher overall incidence of breast cancer among young Hispanic women. This is important to recognize because more efforts may be required to increase screening and health-care access to this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1787-1789
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume84
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

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Hispanic Americans
Breast
Incidence
Breast Neoplasms
Population
Neoplasms
Health Services Accessibility
Registries
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Demonstrating higher incidence of advanced breast malignancies in our young hispanic population. / Klein, Amanda; Villareal, Michael; Radpour, Sepeadeh; Goodgame, Boone; Ali, Sadia; Clark, Adam; Uecker, John.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 84, No. 11, 01.11.2018, p. 1787-1789.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klein, A, Villareal, M, Radpour, S, Goodgame, B, Ali, S, Clark, A & Uecker, J 2018, 'Demonstrating higher incidence of advanced breast malignancies in our young hispanic population', American Surgeon, vol. 84, no. 11, pp. 1787-1789.
Klein A, Villareal M, Radpour S, Goodgame B, Ali S, Clark A et al. Demonstrating higher incidence of advanced breast malignancies in our young hispanic population. American Surgeon. 2018 Nov 1;84(11):1787-1789.
Klein, Amanda ; Villareal, Michael ; Radpour, Sepeadeh ; Goodgame, Boone ; Ali, Sadia ; Clark, Adam ; Uecker, John. / Demonstrating higher incidence of advanced breast malignancies in our young hispanic population. In: American Surgeon. 2018 ; Vol. 84, No. 11. pp. 1787-1789.
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