Development and optimization of modular self-assembling nucleopeptide-based scaffolds for tissue engineering applications

Alexander David Noblett, Kiheon Baek, Laura Suggs

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Statement of Purpose: Scaffolds are fundamental to tissue engineering and scaffold design is a central component of tissue-engineering research. Scaffolds act as cell supports and most promote cell attachment and may deliver biochemical factors.1 Peptide-based hydrogels that can self-assemble are one promising new area of study. Short, self-assembling peptides are often made of an aromatic ring structure linked to the peptide chain, with FmocFF—diphenylalanine conjugated to fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl—being the most widely-studied example.2 Peptides are biocompatible and can aggregate to form fibrous hydrogels that are structurally and in some cases environmentally similar to the extracellular matrix. Such structures do have limitations however, including potentially cytotoxic molecules and gelation conditions and significant changes in kinetic, structural, and mechanical properties when peptide chains are modified; together these restrict cell integration and bioactive functionalization. Instead, if gelation is tightly controlled within physiological bounds, desirable components—to encourage cell adhesion and proliferation, for instance—can be incorporated during self-assembly to create modular hydrogel. Modularity allows for straightforward functionalization in a purpose-built scaffold.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSociety for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019
Subtitle of host publicationThe Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting
PublisherSociety for Biomaterials
Number of pages1
ISBN (Electronic)9781510883901
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Event42nd Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Seattle, United States
Duration: Apr 3 2019Apr 6 2019

Publication series

NameTransactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium
Volume40
ISSN (Print)1526-7547

Conference

Conference42nd Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle
Period4/3/194/6/19

Fingerprint

Tissue Engineering
Scaffolds (biology)
Tissue engineering
Peptides
Hydrogels
Gelation
Tissue Scaffolds
Engineering research
Hydrogel
Cell adhesion
Cell proliferation
Cell Adhesion
Scaffolds
Self assembly
Extracellular Matrix
Structural properties
Cell Proliferation
Mechanical properties
Molecules
Kinetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Biotechnology
  • Biomaterials
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Noblett, A. D., Baek, K., & Suggs, L. (2019). Development and optimization of modular self-assembling nucleopeptide-based scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. In Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting (Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium; Vol. 40). Society for Biomaterials.

Development and optimization of modular self-assembling nucleopeptide-based scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. / Noblett, Alexander David; Baek, Kiheon; Suggs, Laura.

Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting. Society for Biomaterials, 2019. (Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium; Vol. 40).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Noblett, AD, Baek, K & Suggs, L 2019, Development and optimization of modular self-assembling nucleopeptide-based scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. in Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting. Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium, vol. 40, Society for Biomaterials, 42nd Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence, Seattle, United States, 4/3/19.
Noblett AD, Baek K, Suggs L. Development and optimization of modular self-assembling nucleopeptide-based scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. In Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting. Society for Biomaterials. 2019. (Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium).
Noblett, Alexander David ; Baek, Kiheon ; Suggs, Laura. / Development and optimization of modular self-assembling nucleopeptide-based scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting and Exposition 2019: The Pinnacle of Biomaterials Innovation and Excellence - Transactions of the 42nd Annual Meeting. Society for Biomaterials, 2019. (Transactions of the Annual Meeting of the Society for Biomaterials and the Annual International Biomaterials Symposium).
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