Dietary pattern regulates fatty acid desaturase 1 gene expression in Indian pregnant women to spare overall long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids levels

Kalpana Joshi, Maithili Gadgil, Anand Pandit, Suhas Otiv, Sesha Durga Kumar Kothapalli, James T Brenna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine if the dietary pattern of pregnant women has any compensatory effect on the fatty acid desaturase (FADS) gene expression, thus enhancing the conversion of precursors to long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) to spare the overall LCPUFA levels. The dietary intake of plant-based precursor polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) influences circulating levels of LCPUFA. We hypothesized that low LCPUFA diets during pregnancy would compensate by higher expression of FADS genes to enhance the conversion of precursors to LCPUFA to spare the overall LCPUFA levels. Seventy-five pregnant women were enrolled during the last trimester of pregnancy based on the eligibility and exclusion criteria. Maternal LCPUFA in plasma, expression of FADS1 and FADS2 genes, FADS2 Indel genotype status and neonate birth weight were studied.In the vegetarian group (n = 25), plasma α-linolenic acid (ALA) but not linoleic acid (LA) was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than the non-vegetarian group (n = 50). No significant differences were found for arachidonic acid (AA) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels. FADS1 expression was significantly higher in the vegetarian group compared to the non-vegetarian group. There was no significant difference in the birth weight of the neonates between two groups. No significant correlation was observed between FADS2 Indel genotype and birth weight. Our small sample size study demonstrated an increase FADS1expression during pregnancy in vegetarian pregnant women that may have contributed to the maintenance of AA, eicosapentaenoic acid and DHA levels thereby ensuring that the overall LCPUFA levels of the neonate is not compromised.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)687-693
Number of pages7
JournalMolecular Biology Reports
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2019

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Fatty Acid Desaturases
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Pregnant Women
Gene Expression
Birth Weight
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Newborn Infant
Arachidonic Acid
Pregnancy
Genotype
alpha-Linolenic Acid
Eicosapentaenoic Acid
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Linoleic Acid
Sample Size
Genes
Maintenance
Mothers
Diet

Keywords

  • Desaturase, elongase, birth weight
  • FADS genes
  • Linoleic acid
  • Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids
  • α-Linolenic acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Dietary pattern regulates fatty acid desaturase 1 gene expression in Indian pregnant women to spare overall long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids levels. / Joshi, Kalpana; Gadgil, Maithili; Pandit, Anand; Otiv, Suhas; Kothapalli, Sesha Durga Kumar; Brenna, James T.

In: Molecular Biology Reports, Vol. 46, No. 1, 01.02.2019, p. 687-693.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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