Differentiating typical from atypical speech production in 5-year-old children with cerebral palsy: A comparative analysis

Katherine C. Hustad, Ashley Sakash, Aimee Teo Broman, Paul J. Rathouzb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Early diagnosis of speech disorders in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is of critical importance. A key problem is differentiating those with borderline or mild speech motor deficits from those who are within an ageappropriate range of variability. We sought to quantify how well functional speech measures differentiated typically developing (TD) children from children with CP. Method: We studied speech production in 45 children with CP (26 with clinical speech motor impairment [SMI] and 19 with no evidence of speech motor impairment [NSMI]) and in 29 TD children of the same age. Speech elicitation tasks were used. Intelligibility, speech rate, and intelligible words per minute were examined. Results: All measures differentiated between all 3 groups of children with considerable precision based on area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) data. AUC was highest for overall intelligibility, which ranged from.88 to.99. Intelligible words per minute also yielded very strong AUCs, ranging from.81 to.99. In each of the receiver operating characteristic models, discrimination between groups was highest for children with speech motor impairment versus TD children. Data indicated that 90% of TD children had overall intelligibility above 87% at 5 years of age, but that no child was 100% intelligible. Furthermore, 90% children with SMI had intelligibility below 72%. Conclusion: Findings suggest that functional speech measures differentiate very clearly between children with and without CP and that even children who do not show evidence of speech motor impairment have functional differences in their speech production ability relative to TD peers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)807-817
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican journal of speech-language pathology
Volume28
Issue number2 Special Issue
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2019

Fingerprint

Cerebral Palsy
Area Under Curve
ROC Curve
recipient
Speech Intelligibility
Speech Disorders
early diagnosis
Aptitude
speech disorder
evidence
Early Diagnosis
deficit
discrimination
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Differentiating typical from atypical speech production in 5-year-old children with cerebral palsy : A comparative analysis. / Hustad, Katherine C.; Sakash, Ashley; Broman, Aimee Teo; Rathouzb, Paul J.

In: American journal of speech-language pathology, Vol. 28, No. 2 Special Issue, 07.2019, p. 807-817.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{218a5e0baa35488fbdf7cdc13f9c5897,
title = "Differentiating typical from atypical speech production in 5-year-old children with cerebral palsy: A comparative analysis",
abstract = "Objective: Early diagnosis of speech disorders in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is of critical importance. A key problem is differentiating those with borderline or mild speech motor deficits from those who are within an ageappropriate range of variability. We sought to quantify how well functional speech measures differentiated typically developing (TD) children from children with CP. Method: We studied speech production in 45 children with CP (26 with clinical speech motor impairment [SMI] and 19 with no evidence of speech motor impairment [NSMI]) and in 29 TD children of the same age. Speech elicitation tasks were used. Intelligibility, speech rate, and intelligible words per minute were examined. Results: All measures differentiated between all 3 groups of children with considerable precision based on area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) data. AUC was highest for overall intelligibility, which ranged from.88 to.99. Intelligible words per minute also yielded very strong AUCs, ranging from.81 to.99. In each of the receiver operating characteristic models, discrimination between groups was highest for children with speech motor impairment versus TD children. Data indicated that 90{\%} of TD children had overall intelligibility above 87{\%} at 5 years of age, but that no child was 100{\%} intelligible. Furthermore, 90{\%} children with SMI had intelligibility below 72{\%}. Conclusion: Findings suggest that functional speech measures differentiate very clearly between children with and without CP and that even children who do not show evidence of speech motor impairment have functional differences in their speech production ability relative to TD peers.",
author = "Hustad, {Katherine C.} and Ashley Sakash and Broman, {Aimee Teo} and Rathouzb, {Paul J.}",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1044/2018_AJSLP-MSC18-18-0108",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "807--817",
journal = "American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology",
issn = "1058-0360",
publisher = "American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)",
number = "2 Special Issue",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Differentiating typical from atypical speech production in 5-year-old children with cerebral palsy

T2 - A comparative analysis

AU - Hustad, Katherine C.

AU - Sakash, Ashley

AU - Broman, Aimee Teo

AU - Rathouzb, Paul J.

PY - 2019/7

Y1 - 2019/7

N2 - Objective: Early diagnosis of speech disorders in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is of critical importance. A key problem is differentiating those with borderline or mild speech motor deficits from those who are within an ageappropriate range of variability. We sought to quantify how well functional speech measures differentiated typically developing (TD) children from children with CP. Method: We studied speech production in 45 children with CP (26 with clinical speech motor impairment [SMI] and 19 with no evidence of speech motor impairment [NSMI]) and in 29 TD children of the same age. Speech elicitation tasks were used. Intelligibility, speech rate, and intelligible words per minute were examined. Results: All measures differentiated between all 3 groups of children with considerable precision based on area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) data. AUC was highest for overall intelligibility, which ranged from.88 to.99. Intelligible words per minute also yielded very strong AUCs, ranging from.81 to.99. In each of the receiver operating characteristic models, discrimination between groups was highest for children with speech motor impairment versus TD children. Data indicated that 90% of TD children had overall intelligibility above 87% at 5 years of age, but that no child was 100% intelligible. Furthermore, 90% children with SMI had intelligibility below 72%. Conclusion: Findings suggest that functional speech measures differentiate very clearly between children with and without CP and that even children who do not show evidence of speech motor impairment have functional differences in their speech production ability relative to TD peers.

AB - Objective: Early diagnosis of speech disorders in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is of critical importance. A key problem is differentiating those with borderline or mild speech motor deficits from those who are within an ageappropriate range of variability. We sought to quantify how well functional speech measures differentiated typically developing (TD) children from children with CP. Method: We studied speech production in 45 children with CP (26 with clinical speech motor impairment [SMI] and 19 with no evidence of speech motor impairment [NSMI]) and in 29 TD children of the same age. Speech elicitation tasks were used. Intelligibility, speech rate, and intelligible words per minute were examined. Results: All measures differentiated between all 3 groups of children with considerable precision based on area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) data. AUC was highest for overall intelligibility, which ranged from.88 to.99. Intelligible words per minute also yielded very strong AUCs, ranging from.81 to.99. In each of the receiver operating characteristic models, discrimination between groups was highest for children with speech motor impairment versus TD children. Data indicated that 90% of TD children had overall intelligibility above 87% at 5 years of age, but that no child was 100% intelligible. Furthermore, 90% children with SMI had intelligibility below 72%. Conclusion: Findings suggest that functional speech measures differentiate very clearly between children with and without CP and that even children who do not show evidence of speech motor impairment have functional differences in their speech production ability relative to TD peers.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85069930553&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85069930553&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1044/2018_AJSLP-MSC18-18-0108

DO - 10.1044/2018_AJSLP-MSC18-18-0108

M3 - Article

C2 - 31306596

AN - SCOPUS:85069930553

VL - 28

SP - 807

EP - 817

JO - American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology

JF - American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology

SN - 1058-0360

IS - 2 Special Issue

ER -