Does tranexamic acid really work in an urban US level I trauma center? A single level 1 trauma center's experience

Ashley Dixon, Brent Emigh, Kate Spitz, Pedro Teixeira, Ben Coopwood, Marc Trust, Mitchell Daley, Sadia Ali, Carlos Brown, Jayson Aydelotte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The use of Tranexamic Acid (TXA) in trauma patients remains controversial. The CRASH II trial, while randomized and prospective, did not include patients suffering from major bleeding. We wanted to examine our population of patients who underwent a massive transfusion protocol (MTP) (greater than 10 Units of packed red blood cells in the first 24 h of admission) to see if those who were undergoing massive transfusion and received TXA had any benefit in mortality. Our hypothesis was that massively transfused patients who received TXA and those that did not had no difference in mortality. Methods: We performed a single institution retrospective review of our Trauma Registry for all patients who received a massive transfusion between 2010 and 2017. Patients were separated into two cohorts, those who received TXA within the first 24 h of admission and those who did not. The primary outcome of the study was mortality. Secondary outcomes included total blood products transfused, Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary Embolus (PE), Myocardial Infarction (MI), and cardiac arrest. Results: 283 patients received MTP between 2010 and 2017. 179 (63%) did not receive TXA and 104 (37%) were treated with TXA. The groups were then propensity matched and yielded 62 patients in each group (124 total) (ISS 36 ± 12 no TXA vs. 37 ± 13 TXA; p = 0.59). There was no significant difference observed in mortality (50% no TXA vs. 39% TXA; p = 0.21), total PRBC's transfused (20 ± 11 no TXA vs. 23 ± 18 TXA; p = 0.45), DVT (8% no TXA vs. 6% TXA; p = 0.99), PE (2% no TXA vs. 3% TXA; p = 0.99), MI (3% no TXA vs. 0% TXA; p = 0.50), or cardiac arrest (26% no TXA vs. 18% TXA; p = 0.28). Conclusion: There does not appear to be any benefit to TXA administration in Trauma Patients in our institution. This is a single-center retrospective review. More data from other similar centers in the region or the United States is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1110-1113
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume218
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2019

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Tranexamic Acid
Trauma Centers
Mortality
Heart Arrest
Embolism
Venous Thrombosis
Wounds and Injuries
Myocardial Infarction

Keywords

  • Massive transfusion
  • Tranexamic acid
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

@article{3d7c887b454e4c629f50b0a28b6a5ed4,
title = "Does tranexamic acid really work in an urban US level I trauma center? A single level 1 trauma center's experience",
abstract = "Background: The use of Tranexamic Acid (TXA) in trauma patients remains controversial. The CRASH II trial, while randomized and prospective, did not include patients suffering from major bleeding. We wanted to examine our population of patients who underwent a massive transfusion protocol (MTP) (greater than 10 Units of packed red blood cells in the first 24 h of admission) to see if those who were undergoing massive transfusion and received TXA had any benefit in mortality. Our hypothesis was that massively transfused patients who received TXA and those that did not had no difference in mortality. Methods: We performed a single institution retrospective review of our Trauma Registry for all patients who received a massive transfusion between 2010 and 2017. Patients were separated into two cohorts, those who received TXA within the first 24 h of admission and those who did not. The primary outcome of the study was mortality. Secondary outcomes included total blood products transfused, Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary Embolus (PE), Myocardial Infarction (MI), and cardiac arrest. Results: 283 patients received MTP between 2010 and 2017. 179 (63{\%}) did not receive TXA and 104 (37{\%}) were treated with TXA. The groups were then propensity matched and yielded 62 patients in each group (124 total) (ISS 36 ± 12 no TXA vs. 37 ± 13 TXA; p = 0.59). There was no significant difference observed in mortality (50{\%} no TXA vs. 39{\%} TXA; p = 0.21), total PRBC's transfused (20 ± 11 no TXA vs. 23 ± 18 TXA; p = 0.45), DVT (8{\%} no TXA vs. 6{\%} TXA; p = 0.99), PE (2{\%} no TXA vs. 3{\%} TXA; p = 0.99), MI (3{\%} no TXA vs. 0{\%} TXA; p = 0.50), or cardiac arrest (26{\%} no TXA vs. 18{\%} TXA; p = 0.28). Conclusion: There does not appear to be any benefit to TXA administration in Trauma Patients in our institution. This is a single-center retrospective review. More data from other similar centers in the region or the United States is warranted.",
keywords = "Massive transfusion, Tranexamic acid, Trauma",
author = "Ashley Dixon and Brent Emigh and Kate Spitz and Pedro Teixeira and Ben Coopwood and Marc Trust and Mitchell Daley and Sadia Ali and Carlos Brown and Jayson Aydelotte",
year = "2019",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.amjsurg.2019.10.004",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "218",
pages = "1110--1113",
journal = "American Journal of Surgery",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Does tranexamic acid really work in an urban US level I trauma center? A single level 1 trauma center's experience

AU - Dixon, Ashley

AU - Emigh, Brent

AU - Spitz, Kate

AU - Teixeira, Pedro

AU - Coopwood, Ben

AU - Trust, Marc

AU - Daley, Mitchell

AU - Ali, Sadia

AU - Brown, Carlos

AU - Aydelotte, Jayson

PY - 2019/12

Y1 - 2019/12

N2 - Background: The use of Tranexamic Acid (TXA) in trauma patients remains controversial. The CRASH II trial, while randomized and prospective, did not include patients suffering from major bleeding. We wanted to examine our population of patients who underwent a massive transfusion protocol (MTP) (greater than 10 Units of packed red blood cells in the first 24 h of admission) to see if those who were undergoing massive transfusion and received TXA had any benefit in mortality. Our hypothesis was that massively transfused patients who received TXA and those that did not had no difference in mortality. Methods: We performed a single institution retrospective review of our Trauma Registry for all patients who received a massive transfusion between 2010 and 2017. Patients were separated into two cohorts, those who received TXA within the first 24 h of admission and those who did not. The primary outcome of the study was mortality. Secondary outcomes included total blood products transfused, Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary Embolus (PE), Myocardial Infarction (MI), and cardiac arrest. Results: 283 patients received MTP between 2010 and 2017. 179 (63%) did not receive TXA and 104 (37%) were treated with TXA. The groups were then propensity matched and yielded 62 patients in each group (124 total) (ISS 36 ± 12 no TXA vs. 37 ± 13 TXA; p = 0.59). There was no significant difference observed in mortality (50% no TXA vs. 39% TXA; p = 0.21), total PRBC's transfused (20 ± 11 no TXA vs. 23 ± 18 TXA; p = 0.45), DVT (8% no TXA vs. 6% TXA; p = 0.99), PE (2% no TXA vs. 3% TXA; p = 0.99), MI (3% no TXA vs. 0% TXA; p = 0.50), or cardiac arrest (26% no TXA vs. 18% TXA; p = 0.28). Conclusion: There does not appear to be any benefit to TXA administration in Trauma Patients in our institution. This is a single-center retrospective review. More data from other similar centers in the region or the United States is warranted.

AB - Background: The use of Tranexamic Acid (TXA) in trauma patients remains controversial. The CRASH II trial, while randomized and prospective, did not include patients suffering from major bleeding. We wanted to examine our population of patients who underwent a massive transfusion protocol (MTP) (greater than 10 Units of packed red blood cells in the first 24 h of admission) to see if those who were undergoing massive transfusion and received TXA had any benefit in mortality. Our hypothesis was that massively transfused patients who received TXA and those that did not had no difference in mortality. Methods: We performed a single institution retrospective review of our Trauma Registry for all patients who received a massive transfusion between 2010 and 2017. Patients were separated into two cohorts, those who received TXA within the first 24 h of admission and those who did not. The primary outcome of the study was mortality. Secondary outcomes included total blood products transfused, Deep Venous Thrombosis (DVT), Pulmonary Embolus (PE), Myocardial Infarction (MI), and cardiac arrest. Results: 283 patients received MTP between 2010 and 2017. 179 (63%) did not receive TXA and 104 (37%) were treated with TXA. The groups were then propensity matched and yielded 62 patients in each group (124 total) (ISS 36 ± 12 no TXA vs. 37 ± 13 TXA; p = 0.59). There was no significant difference observed in mortality (50% no TXA vs. 39% TXA; p = 0.21), total PRBC's transfused (20 ± 11 no TXA vs. 23 ± 18 TXA; p = 0.45), DVT (8% no TXA vs. 6% TXA; p = 0.99), PE (2% no TXA vs. 3% TXA; p = 0.99), MI (3% no TXA vs. 0% TXA; p = 0.50), or cardiac arrest (26% no TXA vs. 18% TXA; p = 0.28). Conclusion: There does not appear to be any benefit to TXA administration in Trauma Patients in our institution. This is a single-center retrospective review. More data from other similar centers in the region or the United States is warranted.

KW - Massive transfusion

KW - Tranexamic acid

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