Efficacy and patient opinion of wet-wrap dressings using 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide ointment vs cream in the treatment of pediatric atopic dermatitis: A randomized split-body control study

Simi D. Cadmus, Katherine R. Sebastian, Donald Warren, Collin A. Hovinga, Emily A. Croce, Liana A. Reveles, Moise L. Levy, Lucia Z. Diaz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Wet wraps can be an effective means of improving atopic dermatitis (AD). Little research has been done regarding the comparative efficacy of topical steroid vehicles and patient preference. Objective: This study aimed to compare the efficacy of 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide ointment vs cream used with wet wraps in pediatric patients with AD and to explore patient preference/opinion. Methods: We performed a small, randomized, investigator-blind prospective study of 39 pediatric patients experiencing symmetric, bilateral AD flares. Patients were instructed to apply a topical steroid cream to one extremity and apply the same topical steroid in an ointment vehicle to the other extremity using the wet-wrap technique once or twice daily for 3 to 5 consecutive days. Patients were evaluated at a follow-up visit. Results: Comparison of the change in Investigator’s Global Assessment scores disclosed no significant difference between efficacy ratings of cream (mean difference = 0.72) and ointment (mean difference = 0.59) when used with wet wraps (P = 0.22). Although patients found the ointment more difficult to apply, they were more likely to prefer ointments for future prescriptions (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Patient preference of corticosteroid vehicle is what should ultimately drive treatment. In this small study, we found no difference in efficacy between triamcinolone acetonide wet wraps with cream vs ointment. Dermatologists should select the vehicle of the patient's choice as it may increase satisfaction with treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)437-441
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Dermatology
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

Fingerprint

Triamcinolone Acetonide
Atopic Dermatitis
Bandages
Ointments
Pediatrics
Patient Preference
Steroids
Therapeutics
Extremities
Research Personnel
Prescriptions
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Prospective Studies
Research

Keywords

  • atopic dermatitis
  • pediatrics
  • topical corticosteroid
  • wet wraps

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Dermatology

Cite this

Efficacy and patient opinion of wet-wrap dressings using 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide ointment vs cream in the treatment of pediatric atopic dermatitis : A randomized split-body control study. / Cadmus, Simi D.; Sebastian, Katherine R.; Warren, Donald; Hovinga, Collin A.; Croce, Emily A.; Reveles, Liana A.; Levy, Moise L.; Diaz, Lucia Z.

In: Pediatric Dermatology, Vol. 36, No. 4, 01.07.2019, p. 437-441.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Sebastian, Katherine R.

AU - Warren, Donald

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AU - Diaz, Lucia Z.

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