Emergency Department Visits and Overnight Hospital Stays among Persons Aged 50 and Older Who Use and Misuse Opioids

Bryan Y. Choi, Diana M. DiNitto, C. Nathan Marti, Namkee G. Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Opioid misuse and adverse health outcomes are serious problems among the 50+ age group. Using data from the 2015–2016 National Survey of Drug Use and Health (N = 17,608 respondents aged 50+), we examined emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations among those who reported (1) no opioid use in the past year (61.4%); (2) opioid use but no misuse (36.0%); and (3) opioid misuse (2.6%). Compared to nonusers, those who reported use but no misuse or misuse had greater odds of any ED visit (AOR = 2.24, 95% CI = 2.05–2.47 and AOR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.55–2.56, respectively) and hospitalization (AOR = 2.87, 95% CI = 2.48–3.32 and AOR = 2.57, 95% CI = 1.88–3.51, respectively); however, only those who used but did not misuse had more ED visits and longer hospital stays than nonusers. Those who misused opioids were younger, but they did not differ from those who used but did not misuse on ED visits and hospitalizations. Since those who misused had significantly higher rates of other substance use disorders and mental health problems than those who used but did not misuse, treatment of opioid misuse should also include help for these problems. Economically disadvantaged older adults suffering from chronic pain and opioid misuse also need assistance accessing effective pain treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-47
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Psychoactive Drugs
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Opioid Analgesics
Hospital Emergency Service
Length of Stay
Hospitalization
Health
Vulnerable Populations
Psychological Stress
Chronic Pain
Substance-Related Disorders
Mental Health
Age Groups
Pain
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • ED visits
  • hospitalizations
  • late middle-aged and older adults
  • licit and illicit drug use disorders
  • opioid use/misuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Emergency Department Visits and Overnight Hospital Stays among Persons Aged 50 and Older Who Use and Misuse Opioids. / Choi, Bryan Y.; DiNitto, Diana M.; Marti, C. Nathan; Choi, Namkee G.

In: Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, Vol. 51, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 37-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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