Engaging in social rejection may be riskier for women

Gili Freedman, Janell C. Fetterolf, Jennifer Beer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

People often worry how others will perceive them if they socially reject others, but do women have more to fear than men? Although previous research has shown that women are perceived negatively for behaving in counter-stereotypical ways, research on backlash has focused on business settings. The present research applies backlash theory to examine how women are perceived for engaging in social rejection. The findings suggest that backlash may operate differently in social rejection because only men punish women for rejecting. Across four studies, the present research found that (1) women felt they were more likely to be penalized for engaging in social rejection than men, (2) women were less willing to endorse social rejection than men, and (3) men, but not women, viewed female rejectors in a more negative manner than male rejectors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Social Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Keywords

  • Agency
  • backlash
  • gender
  • social rejection
  • warmth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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Engaging in social rejection may be riskier for women. / Freedman, Gili; Fetterolf, Janell C.; Beer, Jennifer.

In: Journal of Social Psychology, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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