Factors Associated With Patients’ Perceived Importance of Opioid Prescribing Policies in an Orthopedic Hand Surgery Practice

Claudia Antoinette Bargon, Emily L. Zale, Jessica Magidson, Neal Chen, David Ring, Ana Maria Vranceanu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to survey the attitudes and beliefs about opioids and opioid prescribing policies among patients presenting to an orthopedic hand surgery practice. Methods: Patients (n = 118; median age, 49 years) who presented to their regularly scheduled appointment at a major urban university medical center completed surveys assessing their sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, beliefs about prescription opioids, beliefs about opioid prescribing policies, and perceived importance of opioid prescribing policies in the department. Results: Many patients were aware of potential risks of opioids (eg, 80% are aware of addictive properties) and would support opioid prescribing policies that aim to decrease opioid misuse and diversion. However, a small but important number of patients have concerning beliefs about prescription opioids (eg, 28% believe opioids work well for long-term pain) or believe that doctors should prescribe “as much medication as the patient needs” (7%). The vast majority (98%) indicated that they would like more education on opioids and that information about prescription opioids should be provided to all patients in orthopedic practices. Patients with higher educational attainment reported a greater perceived importance of opioid prescribing policies. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that opioid prescribing strategies that promote safe and effective alleviation of pain and optimal opioid stewardship will be well received by patients. Clinical relevance: Efforts to develop and test the effects of opioid prescribing policies and nonopioid pain relief strategies on opioid prescribing are merited.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)340.e1-340.e8
JournalJournal of Hand Surgery
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2019

Fingerprint

Opioid Analgesics
Orthopedics
Hand
Prescriptions
Pain
Appointments and Schedules

Keywords

  • Opioid
  • orthopedic
  • pain management
  • patient perceptions
  • prescribing policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Factors Associated With Patients’ Perceived Importance of Opioid Prescribing Policies in an Orthopedic Hand Surgery Practice. / Bargon, Claudia Antoinette; Zale, Emily L.; Magidson, Jessica; Chen, Neal; Ring, David; Vranceanu, Ana Maria.

In: Journal of Hand Surgery, Vol. 44, No. 4, 04.2019, p. 340.e1-340.e8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bargon, Claudia Antoinette ; Zale, Emily L. ; Magidson, Jessica ; Chen, Neal ; Ring, David ; Vranceanu, Ana Maria. / Factors Associated With Patients’ Perceived Importance of Opioid Prescribing Policies in an Orthopedic Hand Surgery Practice. In: Journal of Hand Surgery. 2019 ; Vol. 44, No. 4. pp. 340.e1-340.e8.
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