Health Information Exchange Readiness for Demonstrating Return on Investment and Quality of Care

Anjum Khurshid, Mark L. Diana, Rahul Jain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To study the extent to which community health information exchanges (HIEs) deliver and measure return on investment (ROI) and improvements in the quality of care.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: We surveyed operational HIEs for their characteristics, information domains, impact on quality of care, and ROI.

RESULTS: A 60 percent response rate was achieved. Two-thirds of respondents agreed that community HIEs demonstrated a positive ROI, while one-third had no opinion or disagreed. One-fourth or fewer respondents reported using various metrics to calculate ROI. Most respondents agreed that HIEs improve the quality of care, though several were not sure and were awaiting further evidence. Most respondents indicated that they did not deliver reports on quality measures (76 percent) and that data were not being used to measure quality performance of participating providers (73 percent).

DISCUSSION: Respondents from most HIEs believe that the HIEs are demonstrating a positive ROI; however, a minority of them indicated they had used or will use specific metrics to calculate ROI. HIE representatives overwhelmingly reported that they believe the HIE activities improve the quality of healthcare delivered, but only a few are using data to evaluate provider performance or generate reports on quality measures.

CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the challenge faced by policy makers and healthcare organizations that are investing millions of dollars in HIEs that are believed to improve health outcomes and increase efficiency, but still need more time to develop the evidence to confirm that belief. Our study shows that calculating ROI for HIEs or their impact on quality of care remains a secondary priority for most HIEs. This finding raises serious questions for the sustained support of HIEs, both financially and as a policy lever, given the end of Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act funding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPerspectives in health information management
Volume12
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Quality of Health Care
Health Information Exchange
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act
Administrative Personnel
Surveys and Questionnaires
Organizations

Keywords

  • HITECH
  • Health information exchange
  • New Orleans
  • quality measures
  • return on investment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Health Information Exchange Readiness for Demonstrating Return on Investment and Quality of Care. / Khurshid, Anjum; Diana, Mark L.; Jain, Rahul.

In: Perspectives in health information management, Vol. 12, 01.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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