Identification and Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia in the Emergency Department

Stephen Boone, Jacquelyn M. Powers, Boone Goodgame, W. Frank Peacock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Iron deficiency anemia is the most common hematologic disorder in the United States and worldwide. Yet, clinical guidelines for the identification and management of this disorder in the emergency department are lacking. Objective of Review: This clinical review examines strategies for identifying and treating iron deficiency anemia in the emergency department, with a focus on the role of oral iron therapy, intravenous iron therapy, as well as red blood cell transfusion. The article highlights both the available evidence on this topic and the need for future research. Discussion: The diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia has important clinical implications and, although testing is generally straightforward, it may be under-recognized. The scant literature available describing emergency department practice patterns for iron deficiency anemia suggests there is room for improvement. In particular, intravenous iron may be underutilized and red blood cell transfusions administered too liberally. Conclusions: Iron deficiency anemia is common and many patients can be treated effectively with oral iron. For selected patients with moderate-to-severe iron deficiency anemia, intravenous iron is safe and more effective than oral iron. Red blood cell transfusions should be used rarely for hemodynamically stable patients with iron deficiency irrespective of hemoglobin levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)637-645
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Emergency Medicine
Volume57
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2019

Fingerprint

Iron-Deficiency Anemias
Hospital Emergency Service
Iron
Erythrocyte Transfusion
Hemoglobins
Guidelines
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • intravenous iron
  • iron deficiency anemia
  • oral iron
  • transfusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Identification and Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia in the Emergency Department. / Boone, Stephen; Powers, Jacquelyn M.; Goodgame, Boone; Peacock, W. Frank.

In: Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 57, No. 5, 11.2019, p. 637-645.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boone, Stephen ; Powers, Jacquelyn M. ; Goodgame, Boone ; Peacock, W. Frank. / Identification and Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia in the Emergency Department. In: Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 57, No. 5. pp. 637-645.
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