Improving adoption and acceptability of digital health interventions for HIV disease management

A qualitative study

Kasey Claborn, Ellen Meier, Mary Beth Miller, Eleanor L. Leavens, Emma I. Brett, Thad Leffingwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Disease management remains a challenge for many people living with HIV (PLWH). Digital health interventions (DHIs) may assist with overcoming these challenges and reducing burdens on clinical staff; however, there is limited data regarding methods to improve uptake and acceptability of DHIs among PLWH. This qualitative study aimed to assess patient and provider perspectives on the use of DHIs and strategies to promote uptake among PLWH. Eight focus groups with patients (k = 5 groups; n = 24) and providers (k = 3 groups; n = 12) were conducted May through October of 2014. Focus groups (~90 min) followed a semi-structured interview guide. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis on three main themes: (a) perspectives towards the adoption and use of DHIs for HIV management; (b) perceptions of barriers and facilitators to patient usage; and (c) preferences regarding content, structure, and delivery. Analyses highlighted barriers and facilitators to DHI adoption. Patients and providers agreed that DHIs feel impersonal and lack empathy, may be more effective for certain subpopulations, should be administered in the clinic setting, and should use multimodal delivery methods. Emergent themes among the providers included development of DHIs for providers as the target market and the need for culturally adapted DHIs for patient subpopulations. DHIs have potential to improve HIV management and health outcomes. DHIs should be developed in conjunction with anticipated consumers, including patients, providers, and other key stakeholders. DHIs tailored for specific HIV subpopulations are needed. Future studies should evaluate dissemination methods and marketing strategies to promote uptake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)268-279
Number of pages12
JournalTranslational Behavioral Medicine
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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Disease Management
HIV
Health
Focus Groups
Marketing
Interviews

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Qualitative methods
  • Treatment
  • mHealth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Improving adoption and acceptability of digital health interventions for HIV disease management : A qualitative study. / Claborn, Kasey; Meier, Ellen; Miller, Mary Beth; Leavens, Eleanor L.; Brett, Emma I.; Leffingwell, Thad.

In: Translational Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.03.2018, p. 268-279.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Claborn, Kasey ; Meier, Ellen ; Miller, Mary Beth ; Leavens, Eleanor L. ; Brett, Emma I. ; Leffingwell, Thad. / Improving adoption and acceptability of digital health interventions for HIV disease management : A qualitative study. In: Translational Behavioral Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 268-279.
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