Integration of Microbiology, Pharmacology, Immunology, and Infectious Disease Using Active Teaching and Self-Directed Learning

Natalie Steinel, Gregory C. Palmer, Emily Nowicki, Ernestine Lee, Beth Nelson, Marvin Whiteley, Michael Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In an era of decreasing basic science curriculum at medical schools, we sought to re-imagine how to optimally deliver three core basic science disciplines (microbiology, pharmacology, and immunology) together with infectious disease in a 5-week course. This course, developed as part of a new 1-year pre-clinical basic science curriculum at the recently established Dell Medical School (DMS) at the University of Texas at Austin, featured a fully integrated curriculum in which the majority of the sessions were team-taught. This course, in line with the goals and missions of DMS, presented material using primarily self-directed and active learning approaches. Here, we describe the format and content of the course. We present our strategy and rationale for selecting these particular learning modalities and topics for pre-class and in-class coverage, using educational and cognitive psychology literature as a guide. We also discuss how, based on feedback from both student evaluations and performance data, the course evolved over the first two iterations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)315-324
Number of pages10
JournalMedical Science Educator
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 15 2019

Fingerprint

pharmacology
Microbiology
Allergy and Immunology
Medical Schools
Curriculum
contagious disease
Communicable Diseases
Teaching
Learning
Pharmacology
Educational Psychology
learning
Problem-Based Learning
curriculum
science
school
Students
psychology
coverage
evaluation

Keywords

  • Active learning
  • Basic sciences
  • Co-teaching
  • Flipped classrooms
  • Integrated curriculum
  • Problem based learning
  • Self-Direceted learning
  • Self-regulated learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Education

Cite this

Integration of Microbiology, Pharmacology, Immunology, and Infectious Disease Using Active Teaching and Self-Directed Learning. / Steinel, Natalie; Palmer, Gregory C.; Nowicki, Emily; Lee, Ernestine; Nelson, Beth; Whiteley, Marvin; Lee, Michael.

In: Medical Science Educator, Vol. 29, No. 1, 15.03.2019, p. 315-324.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Steinel, Natalie ; Palmer, Gregory C. ; Nowicki, Emily ; Lee, Ernestine ; Nelson, Beth ; Whiteley, Marvin ; Lee, Michael. / Integration of Microbiology, Pharmacology, Immunology, and Infectious Disease Using Active Teaching and Self-Directed Learning. In: Medical Science Educator. 2019 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 315-324.
@article{696061fd98ac47ab91aca248b28a9865,
title = "Integration of Microbiology, Pharmacology, Immunology, and Infectious Disease Using Active Teaching and Self-Directed Learning",
abstract = "In an era of decreasing basic science curriculum at medical schools, we sought to re-imagine how to optimally deliver three core basic science disciplines (microbiology, pharmacology, and immunology) together with infectious disease in a 5-week course. This course, developed as part of a new 1-year pre-clinical basic science curriculum at the recently established Dell Medical School (DMS) at the University of Texas at Austin, featured a fully integrated curriculum in which the majority of the sessions were team-taught. This course, in line with the goals and missions of DMS, presented material using primarily self-directed and active learning approaches. Here, we describe the format and content of the course. We present our strategy and rationale for selecting these particular learning modalities and topics for pre-class and in-class coverage, using educational and cognitive psychology literature as a guide. We also discuss how, based on feedback from both student evaluations and performance data, the course evolved over the first two iterations.",
keywords = "Active learning, Basic sciences, Co-teaching, Flipped classrooms, Integrated curriculum, Problem based learning, Self-Direceted learning, Self-regulated learning",
author = "Natalie Steinel and Palmer, {Gregory C.} and Emily Nowicki and Ernestine Lee and Beth Nelson and Marvin Whiteley and Michael Lee",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1007/s40670-018-00689-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "315--324",
journal = "Medical Science Educator",
issn = "2156-8650",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Integration of Microbiology, Pharmacology, Immunology, and Infectious Disease Using Active Teaching and Self-Directed Learning

AU - Steinel, Natalie

AU - Palmer, Gregory C.

AU - Nowicki, Emily

AU - Lee, Ernestine

AU - Nelson, Beth

AU - Whiteley, Marvin

AU - Lee, Michael

PY - 2019/3/15

Y1 - 2019/3/15

N2 - In an era of decreasing basic science curriculum at medical schools, we sought to re-imagine how to optimally deliver three core basic science disciplines (microbiology, pharmacology, and immunology) together with infectious disease in a 5-week course. This course, developed as part of a new 1-year pre-clinical basic science curriculum at the recently established Dell Medical School (DMS) at the University of Texas at Austin, featured a fully integrated curriculum in which the majority of the sessions were team-taught. This course, in line with the goals and missions of DMS, presented material using primarily self-directed and active learning approaches. Here, we describe the format and content of the course. We present our strategy and rationale for selecting these particular learning modalities and topics for pre-class and in-class coverage, using educational and cognitive psychology literature as a guide. We also discuss how, based on feedback from both student evaluations and performance data, the course evolved over the first two iterations.

AB - In an era of decreasing basic science curriculum at medical schools, we sought to re-imagine how to optimally deliver three core basic science disciplines (microbiology, pharmacology, and immunology) together with infectious disease in a 5-week course. This course, developed as part of a new 1-year pre-clinical basic science curriculum at the recently established Dell Medical School (DMS) at the University of Texas at Austin, featured a fully integrated curriculum in which the majority of the sessions were team-taught. This course, in line with the goals and missions of DMS, presented material using primarily self-directed and active learning approaches. Here, we describe the format and content of the course. We present our strategy and rationale for selecting these particular learning modalities and topics for pre-class and in-class coverage, using educational and cognitive psychology literature as a guide. We also discuss how, based on feedback from both student evaluations and performance data, the course evolved over the first two iterations.

KW - Active learning

KW - Basic sciences

KW - Co-teaching

KW - Flipped classrooms

KW - Integrated curriculum

KW - Problem based learning

KW - Self-Direceted learning

KW - Self-regulated learning

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065798574&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85065798574&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s40670-018-00689-8

DO - 10.1007/s40670-018-00689-8

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 315

EP - 324

JO - Medical Science Educator

JF - Medical Science Educator

SN - 2156-8650

IS - 1

ER -