Learning principles in CBT

Michelle L. Davis, Sara M. Witcraft, Scarlett O. Baird, Jasper A.J. Smits

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been widely applied to a diverse range of psychopathology. CBT, as it exists today, is a composite of techniques derived from behavioral, cognitive, and social learning theories. Behavioral learning principles underlie exposure therapy, one of the most efficacious interventions to date, as well as a handful of diverse CBT interventions, which apply principles of reinforcement to decrease maladaptive behaviors. Cognitive strategies within CBT utilize principles from theories of constructivism, attribution theory, and metacognition to aid clients in learning how thoughts impact feelings. Finally, social learning theory, which focuses on learning in the context of interpersonal relationships, interactions, and observations, plays a role in CBT, relying heavily upon both therapist instruction and the active role of the participant. This chapter provides an overview of how these learning theories guide CBT strategies, yielding considerations for both clinicians and researchers on how to enhance learning within CBT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Science of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
PublisherElsevier
Pages51-76
Number of pages26
ISBN (Electronic)9780128034583
ISBN (Print)9780128034576
DOIs
StatePublished - May 31 2017

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Cognitive Therapy
Learning
Implosive Therapy
Psychopathology
Emotions
Research Personnel

Keywords

  • CBT
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Exposure therapy
  • Learning
  • Learning theories

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Davis, M. L., Witcraft, S. M., Baird, S. O., & Smits, J. A. J. (2017). Learning principles in CBT. In The Science of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (pp. 51-76). Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-803457-6.00003-9

Learning principles in CBT. / Davis, Michelle L.; Witcraft, Sara M.; Baird, Scarlett O.; Smits, Jasper A.J.

The Science of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Elsevier, 2017. p. 51-76.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Davis, ML, Witcraft, SM, Baird, SO & Smits, JAJ 2017, Learning principles in CBT. in The Science of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Elsevier, pp. 51-76. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-803457-6.00003-9
Davis ML, Witcraft SM, Baird SO, Smits JAJ. Learning principles in CBT. In The Science of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Elsevier. 2017. p. 51-76 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-803457-6.00003-9
Davis, Michelle L. ; Witcraft, Sara M. ; Baird, Scarlett O. ; Smits, Jasper A.J. / Learning principles in CBT. The Science of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Elsevier, 2017. pp. 51-76
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