Magnetization Transfer MRI of Breast Cancer in the Community Setting: Reproducibility and Preliminary Results in Neoadjuvant Therapy

John Virostko, Anna G. Sorace, Chengyue Wu, David Ekrut, Angela M. Jarrett, Raghave M. Upadhyaya, Sarah Avery, Debra Patt, Boone Goodgame, Thomas E. Yankeelov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Repeatability and reproducibility of magnetization transfer magnetic resonance imaging of the breast, and the ability of this technique to assess the response of locally advanced breast cancer to neoadjuvant therapy (NAT), are determined. Reproducibility scans at 3 different 3 T scanners, including 2 scanners in community imaging centers, found a 16.3% difference (n = 3) in magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in healthy breast fibroglandular tissue. Repeatability scans (n = 10) found a difference of ∼8.1% in the MTR measurement of fibroglandular tissue between the 2 measurements. Thus, MTR is repeatable and reproducible in the breast and can be integrated into community imaging clinics. Serial magnetization transfer magnetic resonance imaging performed at longitudinal time points during NAT indicated no significant change in average tumoral MTR during treatment. However, histogram analysis indicated an increase in the dispersion of MTR values of the tumor during NAT, as quantified by higher standard deviation (P = .005), higher full width at half maximum (P = .02), and lower kurtosis (P = .02). Patients' stratification into those with pathological complete response (pCR; n = 6) at the conclusion of NAT and those with residual disease (n = 9) showed wider distribution of tumor MTR values in patients who achieved pCR after 2-4 cycles of NAT, as quantified by higher standard deviation (P = .02), higher full width at half maximum (P = .03), and lower kurtosis (P = .03). Thus, MTR can be used as an imaging metric to assess response to breast NAT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-52
Number of pages9
JournalTomography (Ann Arbor, Mich.)
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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Neoadjuvant Therapy
Reproducibility of Results
Breast Neoplasms
Breast
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • MT-MRI
  • MTR
  • NAT
  • repeatability
  • reproducibility

Cite this

Magnetization Transfer MRI of Breast Cancer in the Community Setting : Reproducibility and Preliminary Results in Neoadjuvant Therapy. / Virostko, John; Sorace, Anna G.; Wu, Chengyue; Ekrut, David; Jarrett, Angela M.; Upadhyaya, Raghave M.; Avery, Sarah; Patt, Debra; Goodgame, Boone; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

In: Tomography (Ann Arbor, Mich.), Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.03.2019, p. 44-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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