More than the medial prefrontal cortex (Mpfc): New advances in understanding the neural foundations of self-insight

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-insight is an important aspect of self-regulation. If we do not know what we are like, then how can we act to ensure that we are meeting our ideals? This chapter explores the neural basis of self-insight, that is, how we evaluate and represent self-relevant information. Historically, the frontal lobes became associated with self-insight through observations of deficits associated with brain injury. Empirical efforts have only begun to emerge and have refined our understanding of how different aspects of self-insight are supported by subregions within the frontal lobes. Most of these empirical efforts address one of two broad questions: At the neural level, what is the relation between evaluating the self and evaluating other people? And what neural regions support the motivational factors known to bias self-insight? After reviewing the current research, we propose a new neural model of self-insight that extends past previous models exclusively focused on the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). Specifically, we agree with previous models that MPFC supports representations of self-knowledge but show that the evidence suggests this region is not exclusively associated with self-knowledge and includes knowledge of other people. Furthermore, we propose that orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) supports top-down influences on self-evaluation whereas ventral anterior cingulate cortex (vACC) supports relatively more bottom-up influences on self-evaluation. The chapter concludes with future directions needed to expand investigation into the neural basis of self-insight.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHandbook of Biobehavioral Approaches to Self-Regulation
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages209-220
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9781493912360
ISBN (Print)9781493912353
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Prefrontal Cortex
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Frontal Lobe
Ego
Gyrus Cinguli
Brain Injuries
Research

Keywords

  • Medial prefrontal cortex
  • Medial prefrontal cortex
  • Self-enhancement
  • Self-esteem threat
  • Self-insight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

More than the medial prefrontal cortex (Mpfc) : New advances in understanding the neural foundations of self-insight. / Beer, Jennifer S.

Handbook of Biobehavioral Approaches to Self-Regulation. Springer New York, 2015. p. 209-220.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Beer, Jennifer S. / More than the medial prefrontal cortex (Mpfc) : New advances in understanding the neural foundations of self-insight. Handbook of Biobehavioral Approaches to Self-Regulation. Springer New York, 2015. pp. 209-220
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