Precision Medicine with Imprecise Therapy: Computational Modeling for Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer

Matthew T. McKenna, Jared A. Weis, Amy Brock, Vito Quaranta, Thomas E. Yankeelov

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Medical oncology is in need of a mathematical modeling toolkit that can leverage clinically-available measurements to optimize treatment selection and schedules for patients. Just as the therapeutic choice has been optimized to match tumor genetics, the delivery of those therapeutics should be optimized based on patient-specific pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties. Under the current approach to treatment response planning and assessment, there does not exist an efficient method to consolidate biomarker changes into a holistic understanding of treatment response. While the majority of research on chemotherapies focus on cellular and genetic mechanisms of resistance, there are numerous patient-specific and tumor-specific measures that contribute to treatment response. New approaches that consolidate multimodal information into actionable data are needed. Mathematical modeling offers a solution to this problem. In this perspective, we first focus on the particular case of breast cancer to highlight how mathematical models have shaped the current approaches to treatment. Then we compare chemotherapy to radiation therapy. Finally, we identify opportunities to improve chemotherapy treatments using the model of radiation therapy. We posit that mathematical models can improve the application of anticancer therapeutics in the era of precision medicine. By highlighting a number of historical examples of the contributions of mathematical models to cancer therapy, we hope that this contribution serves to engage investigators who may not have previously considered how mathematical modeling can provide real insights into breast cancer therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)732-742
Number of pages11
JournalTranslational Oncology
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2018

Fingerprint

Precision Medicine
Breast Neoplasms
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics
Theoretical Models
Radiotherapy
Neoplasms
Medical Oncology
Patient Selection
Appointments and Schedules
Pharmacokinetics
Biomarkers
Research Personnel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Precision Medicine with Imprecise Therapy : Computational Modeling for Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer. / McKenna, Matthew T.; Weis, Jared A.; Brock, Amy; Quaranta, Vito; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

In: Translational Oncology, Vol. 11, No. 3, 06.2018, p. 732-742.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

McKenna, Matthew T. ; Weis, Jared A. ; Brock, Amy ; Quaranta, Vito ; Yankeelov, Thomas E. / Precision Medicine with Imprecise Therapy : Computational Modeling for Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer. In: Translational Oncology. 2018 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 732-742.
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