Pregnancy outcome and fetomaternal hemorrhage after noncatastrophic trauma

Thomas M. Goodwin, Michael T. Breen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

133 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two hundred five consecutive cases of noncatastrophic trauma occurring during the second half of pregnancy were evaluated prospectively. Pregnancy complications as a result of trauma occurred in 18 of 205 patients (8.8%): premature labor (n = 10), placental separation (n = 5), fetal injury (n = 1), and fetal death (n = 2). Multiple regression analysis of the data base showed obstetric findings (contractions, uterine tenderness, and bleeding) on presentation to be highly associated with complications ( 17 88; 19.3%). In their absence complications were rare ( 1 117; 0.9%). Detectable fetomaternal hemorrhage was significantly more common in trauma patients ( 18 205) than in control subjects ( 2 110) (p < 0.01), but its role in managing trauma patients was limited to detection of rare massive hemorrhage ( 1 205) and detection of rare hemorrhage exceeding that covered by the standard Rho (D) immune globulin dose ( 2 205). Fetomaternal hemorrhage need not be quantitated in patients who lack obstetric findings on presentation. Despite rare reports of delayed abruptio placentae, it is doubtful that prolonged observation (greater than 2 to 3 hours) in the hospital is necessary in patients who lack obstetric findings on initial presentation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)665-671
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume162
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1990

Fingerprint

Fetomaternal Transfusion
Pregnancy Outcome
Wounds and Injuries
Obstetrics
Rho(D) Immune Globulin
Hemorrhage
Abruptio Placentae
Fetal Death
Pregnancy Complications
Uterine Hemorrhage
Premature Obstetric Labor
Regression Analysis
Observation
Databases
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • Pregnancy
  • fetomaternal hemorrhage
  • trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Pregnancy outcome and fetomaternal hemorrhage after noncatastrophic trauma. / Goodwin, Thomas M.; Breen, Michael T.

In: American journal of obstetrics and gynecology, Vol. 162, No. 3, 03.1990, p. 665-671.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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