Prescribing Opioids as an Incentive to Retain Patients in Medical Care

A Qualitative Investigation into Clinician Awareness and Perceptions

Kasey Claborn, Elizabeth R. Aston, Jane Champion, Kate M. Guthrie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

HIV treatment retention remains a significant public health concern. Our qualitative analysis used emergent data from a larger HIV treatment study to explore clinician perspectives on prescribing opioids to incentivize retention in HIV care. Data from individual interviews with 29 HIV and substance use clinicians were analyzed using thematic analysis. Prescribing opioids as a retention strategy emerged as a theme. Nine of 11 HIV clinicians reported prior knowledge of this practice; only one of 12 substance use clinicians indicated prior knowledge. Positive perceptions included: harm reduction approach, increased appointment attendance, and sustained engagement in HIV care. Negative perceptions included: addiction potential, increased engagement not leading to better health outcomes, and prescriptions becoming the appointment focus. Some clinicians used prescriptions as a strategy to improve treatment retention, which may be particularly problematic in light of the current opioid epidemic. Understanding motives, outcomes, and clinical decision-making processes is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)642-654
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

Fingerprint

Opioid Analgesics
Motivation
HIV
Prescriptions
Appointments and Schedules
Harm Reduction
Therapeutics
Public Health
Interviews
Health

Keywords

  • HIV
  • addiction
  • adherence
  • engagement
  • opioids
  • prescribing behavior
  • treatment retention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Prescribing Opioids as an Incentive to Retain Patients in Medical Care : A Qualitative Investigation into Clinician Awareness and Perceptions. / Claborn, Kasey; Aston, Elizabeth R.; Champion, Jane; Guthrie, Kate M.

In: Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, Vol. 29, No. 5, 01.09.2018, p. 642-654.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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