Primer: Theoretical concepts in the genetics of expertise

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

What does it mean for a behavioral tendency or skill to be heritable? This basic question is perhaps one of the most vexing and debated issues in all of the social sciences (for a thoughtful discussion of this topic, see Turkheimer, 1998). To many scientists and laypersons alike, the concept of heritability is haunted by the twin specters of predetermination and immutability, specifically, that the more heritable a phenotype is, the less experience matters. However, the fallacy of this logic becomes clear when one considers the realm of expertise. Levels of expertise in a wide variety of specialized domains, ranging from playing a musical instrument to performing quantum physics, necessarily rely on the (typically effortful) acquisition of both declarative and procedural knowledge that can only occur through experience. At the same time, a growing body of behavioral genetic research reports moderate genetic effects on interindividual variation in empirical indices of expert skill (Hambrick, Macnamara, Campitelli, Ullén, & Mosing, 2016).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Science of Expertise
Subtitle of host publicationBehavioral, Neural, and Genetic Approaches to Complex Skill
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages241-252
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9781351624848
ISBN (Print)9781138204379
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Genetic Phenomena
Behavioral Genetics
Behavioral Research
Genetic Research
Social Sciences
Physics
Phenotype
Expertise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

Tucker-Drob, E. (2017). Primer: Theoretical concepts in the genetics of expertise. In The Science of Expertise: Behavioral, Neural, and Genetic Approaches to Complex Skill (pp. 241-252). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315113371

Primer : Theoretical concepts in the genetics of expertise. / Tucker-Drob, Elliot.

The Science of Expertise: Behavioral, Neural, and Genetic Approaches to Complex Skill. Taylor and Francis, 2017. p. 241-252.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Tucker-Drob, E 2017, Primer: Theoretical concepts in the genetics of expertise. in The Science of Expertise: Behavioral, Neural, and Genetic Approaches to Complex Skill. Taylor and Francis, pp. 241-252. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315113371
Tucker-Drob E. Primer: Theoretical concepts in the genetics of expertise. In The Science of Expertise: Behavioral, Neural, and Genetic Approaches to Complex Skill. Taylor and Francis. 2017. p. 241-252 https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315113371
Tucker-Drob, Elliot. / Primer : Theoretical concepts in the genetics of expertise. The Science of Expertise: Behavioral, Neural, and Genetic Approaches to Complex Skill. Taylor and Francis, 2017. pp. 241-252
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