Problem-oriented policing in violent crime places

A randomized controlled experiment

Anthony A. Braga, David L. Weisburd, Elin J. Waring, Lorraine Green Mazerolle, William G Spelman, Francis Gajewski

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    284 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Over the past decade, problem-oriented policing has become a central strategy for policing. In a number of studies, problem-oriented policing has been found to be effective in reducing crime and disorder. However, very little is known about the value of problem-oriented interventions in controlling violent street crime. The National Academy of Sciences' Panel on the Understanding and Control of Violent Behavior suggests that sustained research on problem-oriented policing initiatives that modify places, routine activities, and situations that promote violence could contribute much to the understanding and control of violence. This study evaluates the effects of problem-oriented policing interventions on urban violent crime problems in Jersey City, New Jersey. Twenty-four high-activity, violent crime places were matched into 12 pairs and one member of each pair was allocated to treatment conditions in a randomized block field experiment. The results of the impact evaluation support the growing body of research that asserts focused police efforts can reduce crime and disorder at problem places without causing crime problems to displace to surrounding areas.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)541-579
    Number of pages39
    JournalCriminology
    Volume37
    Issue number3
    StatePublished - Aug 1 1999

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    violent crime
    Crime
    experiment
    offense
    Violence
    Behavior Control
    Police
    violence
    Research
    Academy of Sciences
    police
    evaluation

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
    • Law

    Cite this

    Braga, A. A., Weisburd, D. L., Waring, E. J., Mazerolle, L. G., Spelman, W. G., & Gajewski, F. (1999). Problem-oriented policing in violent crime places: A randomized controlled experiment. Criminology, 37(3), 541-579.

    Problem-oriented policing in violent crime places : A randomized controlled experiment. / Braga, Anthony A.; Weisburd, David L.; Waring, Elin J.; Mazerolle, Lorraine Green; Spelman, William G; Gajewski, Francis.

    In: Criminology, Vol. 37, No. 3, 01.08.1999, p. 541-579.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Braga, AA, Weisburd, DL, Waring, EJ, Mazerolle, LG, Spelman, WG & Gajewski, F 1999, 'Problem-oriented policing in violent crime places: A randomized controlled experiment', Criminology, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 541-579.
    Braga AA, Weisburd DL, Waring EJ, Mazerolle LG, Spelman WG, Gajewski F. Problem-oriented policing in violent crime places: A randomized controlled experiment. Criminology. 1999 Aug 1;37(3):541-579.
    Braga, Anthony A. ; Weisburd, David L. ; Waring, Elin J. ; Mazerolle, Lorraine Green ; Spelman, William G ; Gajewski, Francis. / Problem-oriented policing in violent crime places : A randomized controlled experiment. In: Criminology. 1999 ; Vol. 37, No. 3. pp. 541-579.
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