The gut-brain axis in neurodegenerative diseases and relevance of the canine model: A review

Yoko M. Ambrosini, Dana Borcherding, Anumantha Kanthasamy, Hyun Jung Kim, Auriel A. Willette, Albert Jergens, Karin Allenspach, Jonathan P. Mochel

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Identifying appropriate animal models is critical in developing translatable in vitro and in vivo systems for therapeutic drug development and investigating disease pathophysiology. These animal models should have direct biological and translational relevance to the underlying disease they are supposed to mimic. Aging dogs not only naturally develop a cognitive decline in many aspects including learning and memory deficits, but they also exhibit human-like individual variability in the aging process. Neurodegenerative processes that can be observed in both human and canine brains include the progressive accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) found as diffuse plaques in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), including the gyrus proreus (i.e., medial orbital PFC), as well as the hippocampus and the cerebral vasculature. Tau pathology, a marker of neurodegeneration and dementia progression, was also found in canine hippocampal synapses. Various epidemiological data show that human patients with neurodegenerative diseases have concurrent intestinal lesions, and histopathological changes in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract occurs decades before neurodegenerative changes. Gut microbiome alterations have also been reported in many neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's diseases, as well as inflammatory central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Interestingly, the dog gut microbiome more closely resembles human gut microbiome in composition and functional overlap compared to rodent models. This article reviews the physiology of the gut-brain axis (GBA) and its involvement with neurodegenerative diseases in humans. Additionally, we outline the advantages and weaknesses of current in vitro and in vivo models and discuss future research directions investigating major human neurodegenerative diseases such as AD and Parkinson's diseases using dogs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number130
JournalFrontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Volume11
Issue numberJUN
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Neurodegenerative Diseases
Canidae
Prefrontal Cortex
Brain
Dogs
Parkinson Disease
Animal Models
Central Nervous System Diseases
Microbiota
Memory Disorders
Amyloid
Synapses
Dementia
Gastrointestinal Tract
Rodentia
Hippocampus
Alzheimer Disease
Learning
Pathology
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Animal models
  • Canine
  • Gut-brain axis
  • Neurodegenerative disease
  • Review
  • Translational

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Ambrosini, Y. M., Borcherding, D., Kanthasamy, A., Kim, H. J., Willette, A. A., Jergens, A., ... Mochel, J. P. (2019). The gut-brain axis in neurodegenerative diseases and relevance of the canine model: A review. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 11(JUN), [130]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2019.00130

The gut-brain axis in neurodegenerative diseases and relevance of the canine model : A review. / Ambrosini, Yoko M.; Borcherding, Dana; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Kim, Hyun Jung; Willette, Auriel A.; Jergens, Albert; Allenspach, Karin; Mochel, Jonathan P.

In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, Vol. 11, No. JUN, 130, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Ambrosini, YM, Borcherding, D, Kanthasamy, A, Kim, HJ, Willette, AA, Jergens, A, Allenspach, K & Mochel, JP 2019, 'The gut-brain axis in neurodegenerative diseases and relevance of the canine model: A review', Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, vol. 11, no. JUN, 130. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2019.00130
Ambrosini, Yoko M. ; Borcherding, Dana ; Kanthasamy, Anumantha ; Kim, Hyun Jung ; Willette, Auriel A. ; Jergens, Albert ; Allenspach, Karin ; Mochel, Jonathan P. / The gut-brain axis in neurodegenerative diseases and relevance of the canine model : A review. In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience. 2019 ; Vol. 11, No. JUN.
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