The hippocampus and memory integration: Building knowledge to navigate future decisions

Margaret L. Schlichting, Alison R. Preston

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Everyday behaviors require a high degree of flexibility, in which prior knowledge is applied to inform behavior in new situations. Such flexibility is thought to be supported in part by memory integration, a process whereby related memories become interconnected in the brain through recruitment of overlapping neuronal populations. Mechanistically, integration is thought to occur through specialized hippocampal encoding processes that integrate related events during learning. By recalling past events during new experiences, connections can be created between newly formed and existing memories. The resulting integrated memory traces would extend beyond direct experience in anticipation of future judgments that require consideration of multiple learned events. Recent advances in cognitive and behavioral neuroscience have provided empirical evidence for the existence of such a mechanism, with hippocampal encoding mechanisms—in coordination with medial prefrontal cortex—supporting memory integration. Emerging research suggests that abstracted representations in medial prefrontal cortex guide reactivation of related memories during new encoding events, thus promoting hippocampal integration of related experiences. Moreover, recent work indicates that integrated memories can impact a host of behaviors, from promoting spatial navigation and imagination to resulting in memory distortion and deletion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Hippocampus from Cells to Systems
Subtitle of host publicationStructure, Connectivity, and Functional Contributions to Memory and Flexible Cognition
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages405-437
Number of pages33
ISBN (Electronic)9783319504063
ISBN (Print)9783319504056
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

hippocampus
Hippocampus
Imagination
neurophysiology
Prefrontal Cortex
learning
Learning
brain
Brain
Research
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Schlichting, M. L., & Preston, A. R. (2017). The hippocampus and memory integration: Building knowledge to navigate future decisions. In The Hippocampus from Cells to Systems: Structure, Connectivity, and Functional Contributions to Memory and Flexible Cognition (pp. 405-437). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-50406-3_13

The hippocampus and memory integration : Building knowledge to navigate future decisions. / Schlichting, Margaret L.; Preston, Alison R.

The Hippocampus from Cells to Systems: Structure, Connectivity, and Functional Contributions to Memory and Flexible Cognition. Springer International Publishing, 2017. p. 405-437.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Schlichting, ML & Preston, AR 2017, The hippocampus and memory integration: Building knowledge to navigate future decisions. in The Hippocampus from Cells to Systems: Structure, Connectivity, and Functional Contributions to Memory and Flexible Cognition. Springer International Publishing, pp. 405-437. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-50406-3_13
Schlichting ML, Preston AR. The hippocampus and memory integration: Building knowledge to navigate future decisions. In The Hippocampus from Cells to Systems: Structure, Connectivity, and Functional Contributions to Memory and Flexible Cognition. Springer International Publishing. 2017. p. 405-437 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-50406-3_13
Schlichting, Margaret L. ; Preston, Alison R. / The hippocampus and memory integration : Building knowledge to navigate future decisions. The Hippocampus from Cells to Systems: Structure, Connectivity, and Functional Contributions to Memory and Flexible Cognition. Springer International Publishing, 2017. pp. 405-437
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