The influence of baseline marijuana use on treatment of cocaine dependence: Application of an informative-priors Bayesian approach

Charles Green, Joy Schmitz, Jan Lindsay, Claudia Pedroza, Scott Lane, Rob Agnelli, Kimberley Kjome, F. Gerard Moeller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Marijuana use is prevalent among patients with cocaine dependence and often non-exclusionary in clinical trials of potential cocaine medications. The dual-focus of this study was to (1) examine the moderating effect of baseline marijuana use on response to treatment with levodopa/carbidopa for cocaine dependence; and (2) apply an informative-priors, Bayesian approach for estimating the probability of a subgroupby-treatment interaction effect. Method: A secondary data analysis of two previously published, double-blind, randomized controlled trials provided complete data for the historical (Study 1: N D64 placebo), and current (Study 2: N D113) data sets. Negative binomial regression evaluated Treatment Effectiveness Scores (TES) as a function of medication condition (levodopa/carbidopa, placebo), baseline marijuana use (days in past 30), and their interaction. Results: Bayesian analysis indicated that therewas a 96% chance that baseline marijuana use predicts differential response to treatment with levodopa/carbidopa. Simple effects indicated that among participants receiving levodopa/carbidopa the probability that baseline marijuana confers harm in terms of reducingTESwas 0.981; whereas the probability that marijuana confers harm within the placebo conditionwas 0.163. For every additional day of marijuana use reported at baseline, participants in the levodopa/carbidopa condition demonstrated a 5.4% decrease inTES; while participants in the placebo condition demonstrated a 4.9% increase inTES. Conclusion:The potential moderating effect of marijuana on cocaine treatment response should be considered in future trial designs. Applying Bayesian subgroup analysis proved informative in characterizing this patient-treatment interaction effect.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberArticle 92
JournalFrontiers in Psychiatry
Volume3
Issue numberOCT
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 13 2012

Fingerprint

Cocaine-Related Disorders
Bayes Theorem
Cannabis
Placebos
Therapeutics
Cocaine
Randomized Controlled Trials
levodopa drug combination carbidopa
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • Bayesian
  • Cocaine
  • Marijuana
  • Subgroup analysis
  • Treatment response

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The influence of baseline marijuana use on treatment of cocaine dependence : Application of an informative-priors Bayesian approach. / Green, Charles; Schmitz, Joy; Lindsay, Jan; Pedroza, Claudia; Lane, Scott; Agnelli, Rob; Kjome, Kimberley; Moeller, F. Gerard.

In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, Vol. 3, No. OCT, Article 92, 13.12.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Green, Charles ; Schmitz, Joy ; Lindsay, Jan ; Pedroza, Claudia ; Lane, Scott ; Agnelli, Rob ; Kjome, Kimberley ; Moeller, F. Gerard. / The influence of baseline marijuana use on treatment of cocaine dependence : Application of an informative-priors Bayesian approach. In: Frontiers in Psychiatry. 2012 ; Vol. 3, No. OCT.
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