Therapeutic interventions to lessen the psychosocial effect of vitiligo in children: A review

Simi D. Cadmus, Ashley D. Lundgren, Ammar Ahmed

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Vitiligo commonly affects children, with half of affected individuals experiencing disease onset before the age of 20. Because childhood is a time of advancement in social and psychological development, understanding the extent of the effect of the disease and means of alleviation is crucial. Vitiligo has been shown to decrease children's quality of life, with greater distress in children with highly visible lesions and darker skin tones. This article reviews the literature regarding interventions that have been analyzed in children. Studies evaluating the effect of camouflage, cognitive behavioral therapy, psychological self-help tools, and support groups on the psychosocial aspects of vitiligo were included. The review highlights the ongoing need for studies to better understand the modalities described in this article, as well as others, such as skin dyes, bleaching creams, medical tattooing; week-long camps that cater to children with chronic skin disease; and biofeedback, that might have a role in preventing the psychosocial sequelae of childhood vitiligo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)441-447
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Dermatology
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

Fingerprint

Vitiligo
Self-Help Groups
Tattooing
Psychology
Skin Pigmentation
Therapeutics
Cognitive Therapy
Age of Onset
Skin Diseases
Chronic Disease
Coloring Agents
Quality of Life
Skin

Keywords

  • quality of life
  • vitiligo

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Dermatology

Cite this

Therapeutic interventions to lessen the psychosocial effect of vitiligo in children : A review. / Cadmus, Simi D.; Lundgren, Ashley D.; Ahmed, Ammar.

In: Pediatric Dermatology, Vol. 35, No. 4, 01.07.2018, p. 441-447.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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