Ventricular Tachycardia/Fibrillation Ablation: The State of the Art Based on the Venicechart International Consensus Document

Andrea Natale, Antonio Raviele

Research output: Book/ReportBook

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sustained ventricular arrhythmias-ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF)-are an important cause of morbidity and sudden death, especially in patients with structural heart disease. Therapeutic options for the treatment of these arrhythmias include antiarrhythmic drugs, implantable cardioverter defi brillators (ICDs), and surgical and catheter ablations. Antiarrhythmic drugs have disappointing effi cacy and adverse side effects that may outweigh the benefi ts. ICDs effectively terminate VT/ VF episodes and represent the mainstay therapy to prevent sudden death. However, ICD shocks are painful, reduce the quality of life, predict increased risk of death and heart failure. Catheter ablation, as therapeutic option for ventricular arrhythmias, has been fi rst proposed in 1983. Since then, signifi - cant developments in ablation and mapping technologies have been made. The most relevant developments include the use of radiofrequency energy, introduction of steerable, large-tip, and irrigated catheters, activation and entrainment mapping, electroanatomic mapping with the possibility of performing substrate-based ablation during sinus rhythm, multielectrode mapping with the possibility of ablating hemodynamically unstable VT, and epicardial mapping and ablation. All these advances have contributed to improved outcomes and to a substantial expansion in the indications of catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmias. Moreover, they have generated the need to standardize the different aspects of the procedure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherWiley Blackwell
Number of pages279
ISBN (Print)9781444330731
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 16 2009

Fingerprint

Ventricular Fibrillation
Ventricular Tachycardia
Catheter Ablation
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents
Sudden Death
Epicardial Mapping
Therapeutics
Cause of Death
Heart Diseases
Shock
Catheters
Heart Failure
Quality of Life
Technology
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ventricular Tachycardia/Fibrillation Ablation : The State of the Art Based on the Venicechart International Consensus Document. / Natale, Andrea; Raviele, Antonio.

Wiley Blackwell, 2009. 279 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

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